irina bokova

Kristalina Georgieva, Bulgaria's Eleventh-Hour Candidate for UN Secretary-General While Americans and many in the world have
Sergey Lavrov, Russia's foreign minister, whispering to Sameh Shoukry, Egypt's foreign minister, at a UN Security Council
The latest and fifth straw poll for the selection of the next United Nations secretary-general again placed António Guterres of Portugal as the frontrunner in the informal secret balloting that began in July. But will it matter?
This year has seen the impressive rise of strong, inspiring women at the forefront of global politics. Hillary Clinton stands an excellent chance to be elected as the first female President of the United States. Britain has just elected its second female Prime Minster in Theresa May, while German Chancellor Angela Merkel's principled humanitarian position on the refugee crisis has given Europe much needed leadership. It is obvious why some people say this is the 'Year of the Woman'.
The first straw poll to test the support of Security Council members for candidates vying to become the next United Nations secretary-general occurred July 21, amid strong interest by global media who report on the world body as well as the dozen candidates, the UN's 193 member states and people who follow international affairs.
Image: United Nations. Stock Photo. Pixabay.com Malcorra was already at the center of the cover up of a UN peacekeeper sex
The Paris climate accord, signed by 175 countries in April, was a high point of success for the United Nations. The U.N. has also managed to focus governments around the world on sustainable development goals. Yet, on the security side of the equation, for which the U.N. was principally founded, the record is largely one of failure. (continued)
Bulgaria's Irina Bokova wants to be the first female U.N. secretary-general.
For more than a year now, ISIS and others have systematically destroyed the cultural heritage of the people of Syria, Iraq and elsewhere in the region. Not only have they shelled and bulldozed priceless historical/cultural/religious sites such as the city of Nimrud, Jonah's Tomb, and temples in Palmyra, but they have also plundered them.
UNESCO has long had on its schedule an exhibit titled "People, Book, Land: The 3,500-Year Relationship of the Jewish People with the Holy Land." The content of the exhibit had been approved by archaeological experts and met all pertinent scientific criteria. But less than a week from its opening, the exhibit was suddenly put on hold.