Isaiah Berlin

In a conversation with The WorldPost, the Indian author discusses his book, Age of Anger, and what's propelled a backlash against the cosmopolitan caste.
Timothy Garton Ash recently reflected on Isaiah Berlin and his commitment to value pluralism in the Chronicle of Higher Education
Maybe we are simply too arrogant and self-centered to believe that the questions we pose have lots of right answers instead of the ones we have come up with, that problems have lots of good solutions even if they cause us some other problems.
I have been trying to find the language to express my discomfort with the presumption that anyone who does not welcome very large numbers of refugees into Europe with widely opened arms is somehow resurrecting the ghost of Hitler. Or the right language to express the proscribed thought that those in Eastern Europe who want to settle only Christian refugees might have appropriate reservations about the very real difficulties of integrating very different cultural and religious practices into their distinct way of life.
People who have converted to Judaism often tell me about holiday overload. They go from celebrating a handful of holidays to almost a dozen. Yet, above and beyond the holidays we have certain practices, one of which I did not learn about until rabbinical school.
My girlfriend didn't want to go. I had received an invitation for a lecture on "Oxford in the '30s" to be given by Sir Isaiah Berlin in the spring of 1974 at Balliol College's Holywell Manor.
When you read about the lives of great thinkers and artists, one is forced to note that the human factor is the one thing that is often missing.
His students weren't the usual liberal-minded suspects--who represent a significant swath of Iran's educated classes, incidentally. He taught Mill to largely conservative-oriented students in an institution that cranks out apparatchiks for the Islamic Republic.
We don't have to treat matters of faith dully in order to preserve the complexities, let alone the mysteries, of faith and life. And we certainly don't have to dumb-down our presentation of the Gospel and of the Gospel's intersections with life in order to stimulate the interest of our audiences.
2011-11-29-20111107bothsidesnow.jpgArianna and Kellyanne Conway discuss Jonathan Haidt's new book, which argues that "righteousness" precedes self-righteousness. Through that lens, the women debate their different views of the Trayvon shooting and "War on Women".