isds

If obligations are drafted precisely, and general exceptions included, international economic agreements should not interfere with domestic public policy.
(ii) to accord "full protection and security" ("FPS") (Article II(2)(b)); and For many years, the battle lines over investor
Two new investigations, and a coordinated effort by a group of leading academics, are making the road steeper for President Obama's trade deal.
Financiers will use it to bet on lawsuits, while taxpayers foot the bill.
Despite resistance from within the Democratic party, President Obama has made passing the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) a top priority before leaving office. The TPP is a trade agreement between the United States and 11 other countries which would cover 40 percent of the world's trade.
And yet, TPP backers--mostly the same multinational corporations who helped craft the deal and will benefit from it--are
TransCanada, the company behind the infamous Keystone XL pipeline, just demonstrated the dangers that corporate trade pacts
The goal for all working families remains a secure, sustainable job and a real improvement in our standard of living. Here's how we get there.
A little-known fact, however, is that while ExxonMobil was misleading the public about climate disruption, it was also using trade rules to increase its power, to bolster its profits, and to actively hamper climate action.
Corporate life is so much easier without government regulations.
Did you know that two looming trade deals, if passed by Congress, would newly empower 45 of the world's 50 largest corporate climate polluters to "sue" governments in private tribunals over policies that keep fossil fuels in the ground?
This week, the EC, which secretly negotiates all of the trade deals for Europe, announced that it's agreed with Canada to
Ammon Bundy and his assault-rifle-packing militia took over the Malheur National Refuge in eastern Oregon to kick off the New Year. Their gripe appears to be the Federal Government's pesky grazing regulations interfering with their "right" to earn a profit off government land. Gonna' be a showdown at the last chance corral I guess.
What happens when a government "wins" an investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) attack provides a cautionary tale for the threats posed by the Trans-Pacific Partnerships (TPP). If enacted, the TPP would double U.S. ISDS liability overnight.
The emptiness of past promises stands as a stark warning of the likely emptiness of the promises now to come. We know the trade deal that America needs. If the TPP is not do that, it does not deserve our support: and if it does not deserve our support, that support should not be given.
"Free Trade" was in the news this Memorial Day weekend. President Obama is pushing hard for "fast track" approval of his Trans-Pacific Partnership ("TPP") Agreement, calling for a simple up or down vote without the possibility of amendments or floor debate.
President Obama and the Republican Senators know what they are doing. They are handing gifts to the business lobbies out of sight of the American people, and attacking the opponents of fast track as anti-trade or ignorant, when in fact the opponents are merely pro-public interest. If the President and the Republicans believe these draft agreements are so good, and therefore merit fast track, let them make the agreements public, so that the public could say a resounding NO to ISDS and other threats to the common interest hidden within the draft agreements.