I have watched in amazement the unfair characterization of NBA Hall of Famer Isiah Thomas. The host if inflammatory allegations about him are either factually untrue or distorted. As a result, the media has participated in not giving all of the facts about a case involving Madison Square Garden over eight years ago.
In a league where the majority of players are women of color, we cannot remain silent when a man who has made racially charged, sexist statements is appointed to a position of power. Isiah Thomas is not qualified to lead the community he victimized.
There is a tendency in sports to give breaks to the people who are good at their jobs. We should not do this. But it certainly seems to happen. But when it comes to Isiah Thomas, there is simply no evidence that he is actually good at judging talent.
Here we are, in 2015, and Isiah Thomas is running a WNBA franchise. It seems fair to wonder, as a national issue, are we essentially saying racism is intolerable, but sexism, not so much?
To hire a person to lead a women's basketball team who was found guilty of sexual harassment seems, at a minimum, to be immensely tone-deaf. For others, it is the worst decision James Dolan -- chairman of Madison Square Garden -- has ever made.
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