Israel-Gaza Conflict

The war started July 8, 2014, after the kidnapping and killing of three Israeli teenagers in the West Bank, as well as the
WASHINGTON -- The electricity is there one second and cut off the next. Each time it goes, it can take a struggling patient's
The Gaza war has unveiled my displaced status. Most of my American friends seem helpless in the face of my predicament, yet some are provoked in ways that are mysterious to me.
Palestinian soccer clubs and non-governmental organizations have called on European soccer governor UEFA to this week shy away from awarding Israel the right to host the 2020 UEFA European Championship.
The individual stories are tragically too many to recount in one short article. Those lucky enough to survive this latest assault on Gaza have returned to rubble; the loss of loved ones compounded by the destruction of homes, family heirlooms, photographs and memories. Israel has the power to put an end to its occupation of Palestinian land. Only then can Palestinians and Israelis live side by side in peace and security.
We need real leadership now in both Israel and Palestine, leaders who will not just stammer and blabber, but who will put forth courageous and realistic plans for peace, rather than simply blame the other side and go on preparing for the next war.
Confronting today's Israel and demanding it change is not a rejection of Judaism but the most profound manifestation of it.
Returning Gaza to the Stone Age has not stopped Hamas, the Islamist militia in control of the territory, from inflicting significant political and psychological damage on Israel.
Wars inevitably spark change. That is no truer than in the war in Gaza, no matter what Hamas and Israel say.
Given the current hostilities between Israel and Hamas, I decided to reconnect by phone with some of the people I talked with a year ago. We discussed the dangers they face and the efforts they make to stay safe during the fighting.
As responsible citizens we must demand that our government exercise all influence to bring the Israeli government to honest, productive negotiations with the Palestinian unity government, to achieve lasting justice upon which an enduring peace, security, and prosperity can be achieved by all.
I write this with great sorrow for civilians hurt on both sides. Sorrow for our soldiers who have fallen in this operation, and sorrow for the future of my country and the entire region. I know that as I write, soldiers like me have fired shells into Gaza. They had no way of knowing who or what they would hit. Faced with so many innocent casualties, it is time for us to state very clearly: this use of artillery fire is a deadly game of Russian roulette. The statistics, on which such firepower relies, mean that in densely populated areas such as Gaza, civilians will inevitably be hit as well. The IDF knows this, and as long as it continues to use such weaponry, it will be hard to believe when it claims to be minimizing civilian deaths. As a former soldier and an Israeli citizen, I feel compelled to ask today: have we not crossed a line?
"[J]ust as we try to do in the United States and be as careful as possible in going after targets to avoid civilians," mistakes
It's hard to shake away the utterly depressing feeling that comes with news coverage these days. IDF and Hamas are at it again, a vicious cycle of violence, but this time it feels much more intense. While war rages on the ground in Gaza and across Israeli skies, there's an all-out information war unraveling in social networked spaces.
Israel withdrew its last forces from Gaza on Tuesday, as a 72-hour ceasefire between the country and Palestinian militants
An Indian TV crew says it was able to film Palestinian militants setting up a rocket launcher outside a Gaza hotel on Monday
You can be against the violence without being "pro-Israel"or "pro-Palestinian."
GAZA, Aug 5 (Reuters) - The Islamist group Hamas, the Palestinian faction that dominates the Gaza Strip, has agreed to Egypt's
Ironically, there is another transatlantic transport with the name 'St. Louis' whose story is one of the nadirs of America's storied past. Though little known, perhaps no other moment since the Emancipation Proclamation might well have burdened America's conscience as much.
Earlier, a senior Palestinian diplomat expressed outrage over killings and bloodshed on both sides in Gaza and called for