Israelites

By painting terrorist acts as “Islamic,” certain conservatives ping the religious zeal of their right-wing Christian followers.
The Bible offers guidance on how to respond to attempts at the consolidation of dangerous power.
We enter Ramadan reflecting on the tragic loss of life in Manchester. We pray for the souls of the victims, for the recovery
Liberals are reacting to Trump’s election in dramatic ways. Depression, anxiety, anger, etc. are common. Conservatives are
I believe that God's laws are still in effect today because God makes himself known to us by the law that He writes on all peoples' hearts. The law that is written on our hearts is the same law that God gave Moses over 2000 years ago.
Today, Beersheba is a modern university town of some 200,000 people, at 25 miles from the Gaza strip further than either Sderot or Netivot, though still within range of incoming grad rockets that have at times pummelled the city.
The Old Testament has two different commands for using what are called phylacteries (Hebrew, tefillin): one in Deuteronomy, the other in Exodus.
The Bible often warns against trusting the wrong sources (e.g., false prophets). But in the story of Balaam, the Bible warns against placing too much trust in the right sources -- in this case Moses. The Bible's warning is particularly pertinent to us today, since we are particularly prone to the error of excessively trusting our sources.
It's time to leave our homes and head outside to our Sukkot. What exactly are we commemorating?
The Israelite priests were trained to manufacture and use the Lord's specified mixture, not to propitiate the gods, not to make a nice smell, not to drive away demons or please kings and pharaohs.
Early in "Oliver Twist," a starving, orphaned Oliver asks, "Please, sir, I want some more [food]." The shocked orphanage master responds by clobbering, imprisoning, disparaging and eventually evicting Oliver. Contrast that with God's response to the starving, recently liberated Israelites.
Partners in Torah brings you Harry's Video Blog and the always entertaining Harry Rothenberg. In this week's Torah portion, Parshat Terumah, the Jewish people are commanded to build the Tabernacle and the Ark while still in the desert. Trees don't grow in the desert.
The emergence of practices like "payday" and "predatory" lending deserve the scrutiny of religious leaders and people of faith.
I come to a land that calls me home Pulled in by the suns of August. On each visit, the eyes utter the same words: Electric
Love is about choosing time and time again to stay in the relationship. Shavuot returning in its annual cycle is an opportunity to renew the marriage vow that was made the previous year.
One with power -- economic, social, political, military -- is in the position of an ancient Egyptian in the Exodus story. The question is not the morality of having power but of how one uses it.