IT security

Protect non-computer information. Your paper-based files, bank statements, passport, and credit card statements provide ample
HIPAA... Have you heard of it? Has your IT vendor heard of it? I'm pretty sure that at this point in time you have heard of it. You may actually be very familiar with HIPAA and what it's intended for.
1. Most notably: Third Party Relationships: Risk Management Guidance. Bulletin OCC-2013-29. Office of the Comptroller of
How can your company learn from the U.S. Secret Service's mistakes? Start by developing basic information security guidelines with respect to who can access sensitive data (such as personnel files or other confidential data) within your organization.
"To me, the most frustrating thing is when people treat privacy and security as if they are trade-offs."
the hard lesson learned from this exercise is the ability to identify those people whom I can add to my short list of truly trusted advisors and add myself to my superior's list of truly trusted advisors.
http://www.psmag.com/health-and-behavior/identity-is-lost-without-a-moral-compass References: Let's try a business scenario
Whether consumers choose privacy over convenience is one of the "central questions of our time."
The road to our connected future may be paved with good intentions, but it may not be secure enough to drive on. As reporter
What should have been a trustworthy digital service has been compromised, in the latest sign that the U.S. government can't
Compliance has become a checklist that doesn't align quite right with the dark underground of highly motivated, skilled attackers. That's where security comes in - something security practitioners should be doing more of.
It is beyond refute that for every email sent, there's an excellent chance that someone, or many persons, may have kept a copy.
In this environment, enter universities that are designing degrees, creating knowledge, framing debates, and developing solutions about pressing issues (before, during, and after they become problems). Take cyber security.
The director of the National Security Agency said Thursday that the agency has found a way to prevent further leaks about American surveillance by replacing nearly all its system administrators with machines.
Alexander added, “The intent of what we’re now doing is to come up with ways that limit what people can take, what data they