J. D. Salinger

"We're going as fast as we freaking can," says the "Catcher in the Rye" author's son Matt Salinger.
Does it always involve a power imbalance? Some say yes, others say not at all.
By 1996, upon the publication of the gargantuan novel Infinite Jest, its author David Foster Wallace was the envy of writers. Touted in exalted ways, praised as brilliant, his work produced an "anxiety of influence" for the literary.
In the world of renowned and important authors, it can be argued that no writer has every given us as many interesting real life tales and correspondence than the "Papa" of 20th century fiction: Ernest Hemingway.
It's fitting that the 200th episode of American Masters on PBS features writer J. D. Salinger, an author so influential it is hard to imagine the course of 20th century American literature without his imprint of lost innocence in the novel The Catcher in the Rye.
The Poltergeist Phenomenon is the first and only non-fiction book by Michael Clarkson. He says, "I would stress that I don't believe there's solid proof for them, but I would not say I don't believe in them."
A large segment of the letters -- the first written when he was not quite 8 -- are juvenilia and could be the sentiments of any young whippersnapper. Yet there are occasional hints at what would become the acclaimed Hemingway mode of between-hard-covers expression.
But it wasn't until age fourteen that I met Seymour Glass and fell in love. I read Nine Stories and read it again and found
That rarity, which makes the auction so exciting, also makes it merit scrutiny. And a thing or two about the auction of "The
It's a hard-to-believe EBay listing: a toilet "PERSONALLY OWNED & USED" by J.D. Salinger. Read more on Los Angeles Times
What's missing is the effortless character charisma Salinger provided. It does no damage to the 1951 bestseller. The Catcher in the Rye continues to stand on its own, unassailed.
In 1966, on the set of one of my photo shoots, a mature man approached me and started up a conversation, asking me about my accent, and my likes and dislikes. He then introduced himself as J.D. Salinger.
The only book my mother ever forbade me to read was The Catcher in the Rye. Perhaps if she'd used reverse psychology, I wouldn't have become an avid Salinger fan.
As a sixteen-year-old, I felt that Holden Caulfield's suspicions and black humor and irreverence would inevitably position me as the sort of adult artist I someday hoped to become.
Probably no novelists get traffic. Continue reading on newser.com But Salinger, especially if you weren't there in the pre
Joyce Maynard's dazzling memoir, At Home in the World, reveals the details of her nine-month affair with J. D. Salinger when she was 18 years old.
That's the sort of message you get when you've written a book whose narrator hates "The Catcher in the Rye" and the author of "The Catcher in the Rye" dies.
Salinger has left the building and the literary world is all the emptier for it.
Some fifteen years ago, J.D. Salinger published a story about the suicide of a young man. "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" is
The Glass kids are at the center of Franny and Zooey, the one Salinger book I can re-read every year. With the exception of a short story, it's the last fiction Salinger has published -- and we're talking 1961 here.