Jaffa

Israel functions as the shadow terrain of United States, in that American citizens don't have to face the effects of global terrorism that Israelis have to confront on a daily basis.
The failure to condemn violence of any kind "has to stop," he said Wednesday during his visit to Israel.
In Tel Aviv, Bauhaus architecture meets the azure waters of the Mediterranean, beach bums with longboards sit at sidewalk cafes sipping strong espresso, and eclectic cuisine fuses European culinary techniques with Arab spices.
The Israeli public, more so than their misguided political leaders, must wake up to this fateful reality and decide what kind of future to chart for themselves and for future generations.
Hope is exactly what watching Dancing in Jaffa gave me. The hope to believe that one day Israel and Palestine will co-exist, away from the settlements and politics. But also the confirmation that cultural activism works.
In her latest project My Love Awaits Me by the Sea, Palestinian filmmaker Mais Darwazah decides to fall in love, and through that love, show the homeland she also discovers for the first time.
In his latest masterpiece, Amos Gitai manages to take his audience to a world where we can all coexist and do it with patience, understanding and a grand dose of love. When a film can do that, it's not only a cinematic success, but a miracle.
More than people know, Jaffa is a lens through which the world can understand cultural diversity and cultural freedom in Israel.
Israeli and Palestinian eyewitnesses say that Jawaher Abu Rahma, a Palestinian woman, died after inhaling tear gas fired by the Israeli military at a demonstration. We interviewed two people in attendance.