James Risen

Media
The New York Times veteran will help steer national security reporting and direct press freedom fund.
Media
The veteran journalist, who waged a long press-freedom battle, is taking a buyout as part of the newsroom's reorganization.
Impact
Then we'd be left with us alone, and we'd have to negotiate the force of evil inside us. We'd have to stop scapegoating because
Politics
It is a stretch for many to put ourselves in the shoes of those tortured for what we assumed were reasons of their being at least potential threats.
Politics
Last week CIA whistleblower Jeffrey Sterling went to prison. If he were white, he probably wouldn't be there. Sterling was one of the CIA's few African-American case officers, and he became the first to file a racial discrimination lawsuit.
Politics
A dozen years before his recent sentencing to a 42-month prison term based, former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling was in the midst of a protracted and fruitless effort to find someone in Congress willing to look into his accusations about racial discrimination at the agency.
Politics
Even if the jury's guilty verdict was correct -- and after sitting through the entire trial, I'd say the government didn't come close to its burden of proof beyond reasonable doubt -- an overarching truth is that the whistleblower(s) who provided journalist Risen with information about Operation Merlin rendered a major public service.
Media
The reporter, James Risen, fought for years to avoid testifying in the case, saying he could not discuss his sources. He
Politics
Any rational person would conclude that as a first obvious step just to begin to address the debacle for the APA, the current executive leadership group must be replaced. Without that, internal repair cannot even begin.
Media
Risen was responding to a speech Attorney General Eric Holder gave on Tuesday. Speaking at the National Press Club in Washington
Media
Scandinavian countries like Finland, Norway and Denmark ranked highest in press freedom, while Turkmenistan, North Korea
Politics
Prosecutors were hell-bent on torching the defendant to vindicate Operation Merlin, nine years after a book by James Risen reported that it "may have been one of the most reckless operations in the modern history of the CIA."
Politics
The mass media have suddenly discovered Jeffrey Sterling -- after his conviction Monday afternoon as a CIA whistleblower. At age 47, he is facing a very long prison sentence. As a whistleblower, he has done a lot for us.
Politics
A heavy shroud over this trial -- almost hidden by news media in plain sight -- has been context: the CIA's collusion with the Bush White House a dozen years ago, using WMD fear and fabrication to stampede the United States into making war on Iraq.
Politics
The subject of competence is a sore spot for career CIA employees proud of their hard-boiled affects. From their vantage points, it can't be expunged by dismissing critics as impractical idealists and bleeding hearts merely concerned with the morality of drones, torture or renditions.
Politics
With the Sterling trial, the CIA is airing soiled threads of its dirty laundry as never before in open court. The agency seems virtually obsessed with trying to refute the negative portrayal of Operation Merlin in James Risen's 2006 book, State of War.
Politics
Few pixels and little ink went to the witness just before Rice -- former CIA spokesman William Harlow -- whose testimony stumbled into indicating why he thought of Sterling early on in connection with the leak, which ultimately resulted in a ten-count indictment.
Politics
Hearing the testimony from CIA operatives, it's clear that the agency is extremely eager to make an example of Sterling. Despite all the legalisms, the overarching reality is that the case against Sterling is scarcely legal -- it is cravenly political.