Jane Addams

I had been transformed from a upstanding professional gentleman into a member of the underclass, in one second. A week ago
Being honored as one of 21 Leaders for the 21st Century by Women's eNews is a tremendous honor for me. Even more amazing
Jacobs -- who died in Toronto on April 25, 2006 -- was a true "public intellectual" who put her ideas into practice. She loved cities and urban neighborhoods. She was fearless and feisty. She was a moralist, who believed that people have a responsibility to the greater good, and that societies and cities exist to bring out the best in people.
In today's climate of renewed economic anxiety, many are prompted to jettison this tradition of pragmatic liberal education. In search of short cuts to vocational success, they undermine students' ability to respond to changes in the economy by preparing them only for what is valued right now.
No celebration of Women's History Month would be complete without acknowledging the extraordinary achievements of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, Gilman was the most important feminist thinker in the United States.
Civic studies is a movement to challenge detachment. We seek to reintegrate what the modern world and theories of knowledge based on the stance of being "outside the world" have split apart. Laudato Si' and the civic studies movement both seek a reintegration of body and mind.
Although none of these 20 women were elected to office, they all had a great influence on public opinion and public policy. The reformers profiled below exercised influence not only because of the number of people they mobilized, but also because of the moral force of their ideas.
We can expect the right-wing echo chamber -- including Fox News hosts, Tea Party politicians, and Rush Limbaugh -- to attack Sanders for espousing an ideology that they'll likely describe as foreign, European, and un-American. But Sanders's views are in sync with a longstanding American socialist tradition.
Growing up on the south side of Chicago, Gwendolyn Brooks read and wrote as a child. Her first poem was published when she was 14 years old. She attended college but could not find suitable work during the Depression
Today, we are able to exercise our religious beliefs because of the courageous women and men who came before us. Let's learn about some of the women who strove for religious freedom.