jane eyre

I realized I was gay when I was 10. I did not know how to deal with it. There was nothing I could do. The feeling that I
The Brontë Myth by Lucasta Miller A brilliant combination of biography, literary criticism, and history, The Brontë Myth
I didn't know I loved Jane Eyre until I began teaching it. You would think that after hours of research and hundreds of student papers, there would be nothing new to say about a novel nearly two centuries old.
It’s not Jane Eyre’s most defiantly feminist moment, but somehow it’s the one we cling to.
Though Samuel Foote is not remembered today and therefore another instance in the annals of the millions once famous and now forgotten, he was celebrated in 18th-century London as a wit as well as an actor.
It is unclear what the future holds for this Hunchback. Another Disney project, Newsies, went from Paper Mill to Broadway not so long ago. The same could happen for Hunchback, but then it could not. For his part, Scott Schwartz is just enjoying the ride.
Ever since Dr. Zhivago was announced last month for a spring Broadway berth, I've been thinking: "What other shows that I never thought would make it will come?"
My cinematic crème de la crème takes many forms. It may be one line of dialogue all on its own, or an entire scene's worth. It might be a look or a gesture from one character to another, or to no one in particular. It might be as simple as the quality of light the director captured at a window in early morning.
Sometimes it is not as obvious as a knight riding his horse into battle to face the enemy. Below are different types of courage displayed by five fictional characters who endure so much, and yet always stay strong, never, ever giving up.
Just as there are good and bad adult novels, there are good and bad YA novels. To snidely pan the entire YA genre as being an embarrassment for any adult to enjoy is both small-minded and myopic.
Villette, of course, is not itself free of mixed messages about female empowerment. But it offers an alternate and equally
Today I am thinking specifically about some of the strong female characters who have been featured and memorialized in literature. I've come up with a list of fiction and nonfiction books that unfold around these characters.
Tall, blond, single-minded, lividly pale, charismatic, relentless, and driven to burn-out point by the grand desire to change the world, St. John Rivers is Julian Assange's Victorian doppelganger.
Still, there's much to be learned from the way she chooses to live. Here are some pieces of wisdom that women could learn
Some of the best novels have very believable protagonists, so it almost seems sort of/kind of possible to meet them. One of the pleasures of reading is immersing ourselves in a fictional world to the point where we can imagine being part of that world -- at least as a fly-on-the-wall.
The manuscript of a poem by Charlotte Brontë is up for auction in London next month. Best known for her novel Jane Eyre, Brontë also wrote hundreds of poems during her lifetime.
Chan-wook Park's Stoker is audaciously, in-your-face creepy and exhilarating in a way few films have been since David Lynch's Blue Velvet. Because it's not just the creepiness -- but the way Park gets you involved in his world so that you can't look away.