Jay Bybee

Even if we will not prosecute Cheney and the CIA, we should disbar and suspend Alberto Gonzales, who is in private practice, Jay Bybee who is now a federal appeals court judge and John Yoo who is a law professor at UC Berkeley.
This year's presidential statement on the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture seemed particularly pointed
Liz Cheney may be right that excluding a witness derived by torture will make the government's case against Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani more difficult. But in the end, a fair trial will do far more to defeat al Qaeda than will foregoing justice altogether.
The Defense Department now obstructs justice by suppressing evidence of its own criminal actions. This sordid history indicates the perverse depths to which our nation has unfortunately fallen.
This Sunday should be a reminder that eight long years have passed since the United States' values were subverted and our
Camp Cropper may someday be seen as a symbol of our protracted presence in a sovereign state, as well as a catalyst for its emergence as a no deposit, no return government.
Please consider participating in a 24 hour Fast Against Torture in memory of all those illegally and unethically tortured around the world, including, most importantly, those tortured and waterboarded by the Bush-Cheney Administration.
While the news of Justice Stevens' retirement took most of the media attention on Friday, it's not really a distraction from Dawn Johnsen's fate. Both standoffs reveal the profound ambivalence in Obama's pledges to restore the rule of law.
Murray Waas, "The Case of the Gonzales Notes," the Atlantic, Sept.. 26, 2008. Collectively, Yoo's recommendations, Gillers
The world's greatest democracy should not be in the business of spiriting people out of sight and outside of a legal system with built-in safeguards.
Cheney's attack conveniently shifted the spotlight away from other former Justice Department officials who actually are at risk of professional and criminal sanction.
For anyone hoping the Justice Department would commit to further investigations that the White House instructed its lawyers to find legal justifications for torture, today was a disappointment.
On Friday, the Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing on the investigation into the Justice Department memos that authorized the torture of detainees in U.S. custody during the Bush administration.
If White House officials were instructing the 'torture memo' authors to create legal justifications for a program those officials knew was likely illegal, then we have evidence of a high-level criminal conspiracy.
The DOJ report demonstrates the crucial need for a more full and comprehensive investigation. Until then, the rules of this particular reality game show remain tragically, and dangerously flawed.
The only thing more absurd than Woods's completely unnecessary mass media act of self-flagellation may have been watching cable news pundits rate his apology.
"Poor judgment": me, too! I was against torture, but I voted for . . . yoo. Our long national nightmare is still over, right
The final OPR report is only the beginning. We still don't know who asked Yoo and Bybee to write these memos, what specific instructions they were given or if they were they pressured to reach a particular conclusion.
Dick Cheney may like to call those interrogations "enhanced," but in everyday parlance they're what the DOJ is implicitly acknowledging: tortured.
The longer the administration hems and haws and tinkers with the ethics report before releasing it, the more the stain of the past administration's transgressions becomes its own.