jay rosen

"I'm supporting something different," Kathryn Murdoch wrote on Twitter. "Will you join me?"
With his attacks on the press, Donald Trump is hoping to undermine the truth and indoctrinate his followers.
Donald Trump's call to ban Muslims from the United States is so reprehensible that it's hard to know where to begin. So I'll begin with this: Aside from being morally bankrupt and likely to provoke anti-Muslim violence, Trump's rhetoric is based on a profound misreading of reality.
Instead of covering the horse race, they'll tackle issues on millennials' minds.
It's hard to trust the news overall when many major stories are ignored by news outlets. It's hard to trust the news when the press does so little fact-checking.
The real reason that people call funnyman Stewart "the most trusted news source in America" is that he's an outsider. He rarely worries about offending his journalistic colleagues or angering high-level news sources who won't return his phone calls -- because he doesn't really have any.
Selectively protecting some journalists, and not journalism as a whole, is detrimental to democracy and civil society. Why then do the majority of American mainstream media resources support this Act?
The program, which was filled with smart dialogue, internal conflict and self-righteousness, was a bit misleading about what happens behind the scenes at a cable news network.
While the Internet makes information plentiful, and this in turn may be a challenge to some aspects of the newspaper business, deep insight and trust remain as scarce as they have ever been.
Should we abandon the tradition of journalism that calls for the nearest approach possible to balance and fairness? That's the argument made by NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen.
Lucas then asked for a follow-up meeting where he claimed to have gruesome footage of a Tea Party gathering and asked how
The increasingly disorderly fight over raising the debt ceiling has not only exposed the petty dysfunctions of the US Congress, it has also revealed a core failure of American political journalism.
When dictators understand the power of social and mobile, they move toward controlling it or shutting it down. There was hearty agreement that access to the Internet should be an "international right."
Instead of the current format for campaign reporting, in which reporters are dispatched to cover candidates and then return to measure the responses of Americans, reporters should instead be dispatched to cover America and force the candidates to follow.
The debate over news and new media is too often tribal. And though it may make for lively debate, tribalism impairs judgment.
The truth is that the sanity of the majority of the American people never had to be restored. It has been there all along. What was lacking was the passion and the commitment to make sane ideas happen in the face of fear and opposition.
Shocker: For 2011, BBC has "explicitly parked climate change in the category 'Done That Already, Nothing New to Say'." Read
Rosen offers 10 pieces of advice to the incoming class of journalists to help them "break free" from the last media interval. It is advice that with a little work and some license we can make work equally for advertisers.
At the end of 2009, Jay Rosen offered the world his "Simple Fix for the Messed Up Sunday Shows." Now, Rosen is back with some suggestions for CNN. They should listen to him!