jay rosen

"I'm supporting something different," Kathryn Murdoch wrote on Twitter. "Will you join me?"
With his attacks on the press, Donald Trump is hoping to undermine the truth and indoctrinate his followers.
Donald Trump's call to ban Muslims from the United States is so reprehensible that it's hard to know where to begin. So I'll begin with this: Aside from being morally bankrupt and likely to provoke anti-Muslim violence, Trump's rhetoric is based on a profound misreading of reality.
Instead of covering the horse race, they'll tackle issues on millennials' minds.
It's hard to trust the news overall when many major stories are ignored by news outlets. It's hard to trust the news when the press does so little fact-checking.
The real reason that people call funnyman Stewart "the most trusted news source in America" is that he's an outsider. He rarely worries about offending his journalistic colleagues or angering high-level news sources who won't return his phone calls -- because he doesn't really have any.
Selectively protecting some journalists, and not journalism as a whole, is detrimental to democracy and civil society. Why then do the majority of American mainstream media resources support this Act?
The program, which was filled with smart dialogue, internal conflict and self-righteousness, was a bit misleading about what happens behind the scenes at a cable news network.
While the Internet makes information plentiful, and this in turn may be a challenge to some aspects of the newspaper business, deep insight and trust remain as scarce as they have ever been.
Should we abandon the tradition of journalism that calls for the nearest approach possible to balance and fairness? That's the argument made by NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen.