Jean-Paul Sartre

A liberal's angst at the dawn of Trump The man groans, "We finally really did it ... You maniacs! You blew it up! Ah, damn
Irritating and irascible, the subject of the documentary short, Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah, the French intellectual
Perhaps a further distinction should be made between literary works that impart meaning to war and those that face the fact that, of all human experiences, war is one of the most thoroughly senseless.
It's been 15 years since I learned that I had Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, a set of blood cancers, which, as they say, can be managed but not cured. When I received this devastating news, I thought that my relatively short life would soon be over.
Hot summer romances are a long distant memory as the northern hemisphere winter closes in and tempts us towards hibernation, hot chocolate, and heated holiday party debates.
New York City moves fast and aspirations soar higher than skyscrapers. The philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre described it as a place for people who can focus to infinity and whenever he stopped walking quickly, he felt anxious.
At Tuesday's Republican debate, Sen. Marco Rubio Esq. grabbed the gold medal for bogus populism (and crappy grammar) by proclaiming, "welders make more money than philosophers. We need more welders and less philosophers."
Swirling around my head since this morning are the many André Glucksmanns that I have known. Caroming, they send me into zones of memory that I had not expected to revisit so soon.
We want this for others because we would want it for ourselves. The demand for others to receive the same standards as we enjoy is as real as any other cause.
Could you murder, if it was for a good cause? Woody Allen's movie Irrational Man toys with this question, and whether murder can be justified on existential grounds.
On Saturday July 18 the best cocktail bars in the world were judged at the Tales of the Cocktail Annual Spirited Awards in New Orleans. New York City was well represented. The Dead Rabbit took home awards for the World's Best Cocktail Bar and Menu.
When Johnny Depp raises a wry eyebrow on screen, it's an "existential performance." When Donald Rumsfeld spoke of "unknown unknowns," it was existential poetry. Though many politicians and entertainers welcome the label, now applied so loosely, Camus certainly did not.
Jérôme Garcin has completed his heroic trilogy. Twenty years ago he gave us Pour Jean Prévost. In 2013, Bleus horizons resurrected poet Jean de La Ville de Mirmont, who was killed at age 28 during the first months of the First World War.
On the initiative of the Bibliothèque National de France, the review La Règle du Jeu, and two young philosophers, Joseph Cohen and Raphaël Zagury-Orly, a major symposium was held last week on the subject of Heidegger and "the Jews." Over the discussions hung the appearance of Heidegger's famous "Black Notebooks," in which his anti-Semitism shows its face plainly.
As many around the world said to Americans in September 2001, we say to the men and women throughout Paris, France and Europe today: You are not alone. Our unity will ultimately triumph, and our cause will ultimately prevail.
It is one thing to travel to France and demonstrate solidarity with the French people after the horrific execution of 12 journalists at the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo; it is an entirely different matter to use the occasion to call on French Jews to immigrate to Israel to avoid anti-Semitism and "live secure and peaceful lives."
I'm an English major, member of the Dog Writers Association of America, and big fan of animal rescue, so my heart did cartwheels when I heard about "Poetic Dogs."
This is not the first time that Manuel Valls has proposed changing the name of the French Socialist Party. That he has returned to the subject from the vantage point of his present position -- which is, like it or not, the head of the majority -- obviously gives his suggestion new weight.
It was winter, 1971, my last semester as a philosophy major at Bucknell University. Studying Plato, Kant, Sartre and company had been invaluable for its own sake; that it had taught me to think critically and act decisively was a bonus.