Jean-Paul Sartre

Oh, hold on...Here he comes to drain the swamp in Washington, a Yeatsean shape with lion body and the head of a man with
The problem with a short documentary with so fascinating a subject as Claude Lanzmann, it leaves you wanting more, especially
Perhaps a further distinction should be made between literary works that impart meaning to war and those that face the fact that, of all human experiences, war is one of the most thoroughly senseless.
It's been 15 years since I learned that I had Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, a set of blood cancers, which, as they say, can be managed but not cured. When I received this devastating news, I thought that my relatively short life would soon be over.
Hot summer romances are a long distant memory as the northern hemisphere winter closes in and tempts us towards hibernation, hot chocolate, and heated holiday party debates.
New York City moves fast and aspirations soar higher than skyscrapers. The philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre described it as a place for people who can focus to infinity and whenever he stopped walking quickly, he felt anxious.
At Tuesday's Republican debate, Sen. Marco Rubio Esq. grabbed the gold medal for bogus populism (and crappy grammar) by proclaiming, "welders make more money than philosophers. We need more welders and less philosophers."
Swirling around my head since this morning are the many André Glucksmanns that I have known. Caroming, they send me into zones of memory that I had not expected to revisit so soon.
We want this for others because we would want it for ourselves. The demand for others to receive the same standards as we enjoy is as real as any other cause.