Jeff Nichols

The family has the good fortune to live in a time of social change. Jeter resonates to the Civil Rights Movement of the early
Things get very strange in this episode of the MovieFilm Podcast -- Doctor Strange, that is! Yes, the latest superhero epic
But even in the throes of the cult of the domesticity in the late 50s and 60s, you have this couple that should fit in the
They had a very good reputation for supporting things like this. Also, they had made Man of Steel. They knew Michael Shannon
What do you look for in the movies you watch? Dunst: I think some movies I've loved and they changed the way I think about
Midnight Special opens in theaters March 18th. In mid-April, NYC audiences will be treated to two more unique Michael Shannon
Cults, car chases, a kid with lazer beam eyes, a satellite from outer space! What more could you want in a movie? As director
Michael Shannon and Jeff Nichols' latest collaboration opens March 18.
Berlin, so far, has been cathartic for me. I've watched a movie, The Dreamed Ones by Ruth Beckermann, that reinvents the idea of romance and takes it to a cerebral level, thus suggesting the concept that in order to love, we don't have to be next to a person, it's enough to feel them to carry them in our heart.
In Mud -- the new film by Jeff Nichols -- two boys find an island -- and come of age. Using a southern bayou as a backdrop, Mud oozes metaphors of manhood, and how the construct of what it means to be a man has changed.
Mud skillfully yet almost casually manages to mix a coming of age tale, a twisty crime thriller, and a tragic love story in the slow-flowing waters of the Mississippi river, producing a masterful film with an edgy, contemporary darkness, yet with the timeless feel of adolescent adventures.
There is something both engaging and unique about Jeff Nichols' plain-spoken tale of youngsters learning hard lessons about the nature of love and the darker side of the adult world.
Breaking Point: There were several moments that signaled I needed to lose the weight, but I think I was just finally sick
Roland Emmerich's been making disaster films since time can remember, yet for all his besetting humans with floods, fires, and earthquakes, he's never managed to make something as resonant, affecting, and powerful as Take Shelter.
Moody and portentous, Jeff Nichols' Take Shelter stars the actor who may be our most readily accessible force of darkness at this point in cinematic history: Michael Shannon.
The summer has felt like a Jessica Chastain festival: to name two, she stars as a decidedly unconventional Southern housewife in The Help and a Mossad secret agent in The Debt.