jefferson airplane

Balin's touchstone band provided the soundtrack to the '60s.
News of the death of Paul Kantner, formerly of the Jefferson Airplane, reminded me of an early encounter I had with him.
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Paul Kantner, one of the founding members of 1960s San Francisco psychedelic rock band Jefferson
"There are incredible opera houses and singers and orchestras that are really sweating it right now. I don't know if I'm going to save them necessarily myself but I do feel indebted to what that music has given me and I want to give back to that world."
In the middle of the terrace barbecue, I was thinking about Alice, Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson Airplane, and the White Rabbit, all marching to the tune of their own inner fife and drummers. All in the name of Independence.
When you think about it, the 1970s weren't as bad as those of us who tend to prefer the 1960s often like to say. There was unquestionably some good entertainment and some good times, even if we didn't like the clothes we were wearing.
The legendary rock impresario Bill Graham was not a particularly observant Jew. There is nothing specifically Jewish about the bands he worked with, such as the Grateful Dead or the Rolling Stones, or the venues in which he produced concerts, such as at the Fillmore (East and West) and Winterland arenas.
I'll never meet Art Kane, but I think if I had the chance to tell him what his pictures mean to me, and that I never knew his name or how he did what he did -- he would be most flattered.
It's often been said, "There's nothing like a Grateful Dead concert." While that's certainly true, there is also nothing like a Hot Tuna concert. Unlike Dead Heads, Tuna Fans tend to be more rowdy and aggressive, less "Peace and Love, man" and more likely to scream out "Hot Fuckin Tuna" to regularly startle everybody.