jennifer-golbeck

2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgMost of us would argue that our online identities are not who we really are. Rather, it's the mask we have to wear in today's social Internet.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgWhen the process for sharing data is transparent and linked to specific goals, most people don't mind revealing their data. And while most people understand this value at a retail level, another place where this is particularly true is when they're at work.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgBig Data could lead to the greatest advances society has seen in generations. Or, it could take us down a path of poor decisions and increased discrimination. Eating curly fries (unfortunately!) wont make us smart enough to guide the right decisions, but collaboration between technologists, policymakers, and businesses could.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgEffective transparency is not a one-way mirror that reduces individuals to being spectators on how their data is used. Instead, meaningful transparency requires both inbound and outbound information flows. It requires institutions (commercial and governmental) to listen and act upon the wants and needs of individuals.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgGolbeck succumbs to a dangerous, self-fulfilling fatalism, one all too common among other well-meaning proponents of her alternative solution -- namely, to simply arm individual users with more digital tools to fight back.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgMost of us simply find it too tiring, too complex, to pay much attention to all the privacy settings out there. How many of us, for example, actually change the password settings when we are supposed to? We assume, naively, that there must be some kind of law out there that keeps corporations from going too far with all that data they are collecting on us.
Are you sharing more than you mean to online? Computer scientist Jennifer Golbeck explains how the simple act of "liking" something on social media reveals more personal information about you than you'd think. Is this what privacy looks like in the digital age - or is there another way?