Jeremy Irons

A British biopic has a couple stellar acting performances.
At a special dinner honoring The Man Who Knew Infinity movie, and Academy Award winner Jeremy Irons at Bagatelle in the Meatpacking
For some, even the talk of math inspires a mind freeze. The actor Dev Patel who plays a real life math genius from Madras
It has been called dark, somber, convoluted, overstuffed, loud, fascist, nihilistic -- and the descriptions go on. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice has touches of all that, some more than others. But it's still worth the watch.
Meanwhile the ending of this fiasco is just silly and goes on forever and then some. It is a bit of an irony that the Belgium
Stephan James portrays Owens during the Nazi-impacted 1936 games.
Peter Sollett's Freeheld was, for me, the find of the day -- an intensely emotional film based on a true story that could easily win Julianne Moore her second Oscar in a row (and, perhaps, earn a nomination for the terrific Michael Shannon).
Would I ever have ventured to see Seven Brides for Seven Brothers remade on a New York stage? Doubtful. All that death-defying Michael Kidd choreography cannot be replicated away from the camera, I would have thought. But outdoors in London in August? Why not?
April 26, is the 95th anniversary of the death of one of the most astounding mathematical geniuses of all time, the self-taught Indian mathematician Srinivasa Iyengar Ramanujan (1887-1920), whose stunning contributions to many areas of mathematics are still being plumbed by experts today.
The sun is sinking, and there's a nip in the air, so he's moved inside from a courtyard where he'd been doing a TV interview. But he admits he's been warmed by the appreciation he received during a tribute a couple of nights earlier at the Marrakech International Film Festival.