Jesse Eisenberg

Like Jesse Eisenberg in "Batman v Superman," Leto is overcooked.
In Woody Allen's new movie, Café Society, Kristen Stewart plays a girl from Nebraska who tries her luck in 1930's Hollywood
When Doerries puts on a show, a Greek chorus from the heavens sings praise of the scale of his ambition, and well, yes... hubris. He has taken the very same Greek dramatists that have inspired the culture wars and the politics of identity, and redeployed them in the service of public health.
I know I am late. I waited forever to go see the Batman vs Superman movie.
There's a certain athleticism to his work, which is not surprising given his background as a champion skateboarder who caught
Both Batman and Superman are laughing all the way to the nearest Metropolis (or Gotham) bank. Even still, I offer a word of advice. If you go in aware that the film drags a bit more than it should and doesn't contain as many quips as a Joss Whedon adaptation would have, then you'll be better off.
It has been called dark, somber, convoluted, overstuffed, loud, fascist, nihilistic -- and the descriptions go on. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice has touches of all that, some more than others. But it's still worth the watch.
The director returns to France alongside Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg.
Justice dawned at the box office to the tune of record-breaking $167 million opening weekend, but the questions remains: Is
Make no mistake, Batman v. Superman is a joyless, tedious slog. It goes out of its way to create a superhero universe so
Jesse Eisenburg's Lex Luthor stole the show. His mumbly, stuttering, tic-filled demeanor gave us a look into the intricacy that is Luthor's sick mind. Eisenburg's ability to make you uncomfortable each time he fills the screen means he's doing his job and doing it well.
The plot of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is that Metropolis has been raised to the ground and Batman believes Superman