Jewish Federations of North America

Minority faith communities are undergoing great stress in today’s America. Over the past several months, Jewish cemeteries
The calls to Jewish schools and centers in nine states all occurred within the span of one day.
An eye-catching exhibit during Banned Book Week 2015 resurrects the history of a 1983 book-banning in Tucson, AZ.
I hold enormous amounts of pride in my family's history. The stories begin with my grandfather Misha's survival and his courageous acts of rescue during World War II, which allowed multiple families to continue their lineage.
Change is happening. In the past couple of years, we've seen the number of requests from day schools, summer camps, youth movements and other institutions for resources and training around trans issues grow exponentially.
The ABLE Act is a necessary measure to ensure equality and independence for all Americans. It signifies that our country values the rights of all individuals and recognizes the potential within each and every one of us. The time is right, and the time is now, to make this dream a reality at last.
We reject your organization’s promotion of the “well being of Jews worldwide” as you support a war that leaves our friends
People with disabilities live in our neighborhoods, go to school with our children, shop at our stores, but too often, we don't know them.
Even in our fragile economy, Americans still want to give back to those who need help the most. However, charitable giving will suffer should the deduction be limited.
Inclusion means ensuring everyone can access Jewish institutions and activities, and understanding that each one of us has a role to play so that all people are welcome and can participate meaningfully.
We do all of this because we believe in the importance of an inclusive Jewish community, and that it is our responsibility to ensure people with disabilities are included when making important decisions about everyday Jewish life and our Jewish future.
The Senate must ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities as soon as it can be considered. This treaty is good for American citizens, for American business, for American values and leadership, and for millions across the globe. It is, simply put, the right thing to do.
If we go by numbers alone, the non-Orthodox American Jewish community is facing an existential crisis. The study clearly demonstrates that we stand at an urgent crossroads for American Jewry, and presents us with a major opportunity.
Inclusion is about more than just providing an opportunity to work. Inclusion is about every facet of Jewish life.
As we face what's become known as the silver tsunami, the aging of the 77 million American baby boomers, soaring long-term care costs will leverage the future for our children and grandchildren by putting their own American dream at risk.
What kind of peace can be born from inflaming hostilities? In process and in outcome, BDS is no way to pursue a peaceful resolution.
The financial strain on individuals with disabilities and their families today is not just a matter of dollars and cents; it's a matter of planning for tomorrow and the long-term future to ensure their independence and inclusion in their community.