Jim Brown

The man that spoke of his love fest with Trump was legendary football great Jim Brown. Brown had barely got the loving words of praise about Trump out his mouth before the predictable debate raged.
In four weeks, there will be loud sounds erupting in Cleveland, but they are unlikely to be so joyous. They, too, will in a sense be coming from the Bay Area, as an echo from 52 years ago.
Muhammad Ali defined my assimilation as an American and growth as global citizen. He was so different that we might have expected him to go to the grave screaming of his greatness. However, we all saw a piece of ourselves in him, and his greatest character strength was that he saw in everyone he met a connection to the higher.
As the punning title suggests, this thoughtfully installed exhibition is concerned with the interplay between materiality and virtuality, content and form, and meaning and sensory perception.
"I am the greatest!" Who can forget the cocky trademark phrase that was delivered by the most endearing boxer of all time? Retracing Muhammad Ali's vibrant life is an opportunity for audiences to reexamine American history.
Jim Brown: "First of all, rock 'n' roll had been outlawed in the beginning in the Soviet Union. In a way -- and I'm making a larger film about this -- rock 'n' roll became a way to protest the government and to stick up for individualism."
Why were a boxer and a baseball player of such consequence? The answer lies in the tortured history of the treatment of African Americans dating back to the late 1800s.
Arizona Congressional candidate Jim Brown (R) has apologized for comparing entitlements to slavery in a Facebook post on
Or during the 2008 incident when golf commentators invoked the idea of a lynch mob with regards to Tiger Woods' opponents