jim gilmore

It is now official. Seventeen candidates ran for the Republican presidential nomination, and the sixteenth of these just suspended his campaign. This leaves Donald Trump as the last man standing.
Telemundo's Arraras may pursue the immigration issue which, on net balance, likely would help Trump. There will be the usual
Last night, New Hampshire shook up the presidential race and roiled what were already less-than-calm waters, in both the Democratic Party and the GOP. On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton looks a lot weaker than she did a few weeks ago.
"He exceeded expectations," says Gilmore's biggest, and maybe only, fan in Des Moines.
With the Iowa caucuses upon us, it seems like every Republican tramping through the snow claims to be a Bible-believing, God-fearing, Jesus-loving Christian. Some trot out their parents; others offer personal conversion stories. Some defend persecuted Christians; others explain their policies in Biblical terms. It's a fruitless exercise.
Everyone else's chances for victory almost require Trump's support in the polls to suffer serious damage. If nobody else manages to break into the front rank, then Trump is the best-positioned candidate to win the nomination -- hands down.
It's been a month since I last took a look at the Republican presidential horserace, and there have been a number of dramatic developments in the meantime. So it's time once again to cast an eye over the Republican field.