jim yong kim

Jim Kim's backward-looking bet on mega-dams has not delivered results. The Inga 3 Dam has faced years of delays, and the
The year 2015 was a pivotal time when humanity turned more decisively toward building a thriving and sustainable world.
At a time when the World Bank is poised to increase its investment in fragile and conflict states, and return to its bad old ways of lending to mega-projects like big dams and infrastructure, strong safeguards to ensure the poorest and most vulnerable don't pay the price are more important than ever.
WASHINGTON -- In just six weeks, world leaders will meet in Paris to negotiate a new global climate change agreement. To date, some 150 countries have submitted plans detailing how they will move their economies along a more resilient low-carbon trajectory. These plans represent the first generation of investments to be made in order to build a competitive future without the dangerous levels of carbon dioxide emissions that are now driving global warming.
It will be "extraordinarily difficult," but possible if countries invest in their people.
New safeguard proposal would "vastly weaken" protections, they say.
The public is right: The world is not prepared for the next epidemic. We're no better equipped to respond quickly to an outbreak than we were a year ago. But we can be - and at a fraction of what it would cost if we don't act urgently.
At this stage, it is unclear how long this process is going to last and moreover, how the World Bank Board will resolve its deep divide.
Unless the global community strikes an effective deal to rein in its carbon emissions, unchecked climate change could usher in a hellish world of lethal heat, soaring food prices, and the failure of even wealthy states.
Although the staff survey was conducted before Houdart’s punishment was announced, Houdart has maintained that the case against
Information on projects worldwide should be available for all to see online when it becomes available. A completely new culture of openness at the bank would go a long way toward growing trust between the bank, civil society organizations, the private sector and bank clients the world over.
Reports of the Bank violating its own safeguards on resettlement policies and forcing over 3.4 million people from their homes and property over the past decade were a public relations nightmare for the Bank. And that was before Friday morning's demonstration.
The conference tasked with agreeing the new disaster reduction plan opens on Saturday and will be attended by U.N. Secretary
This conclusion, announced by the bank on Wednesday, amounts to a reversal of its previous efforts to downplay concerns raised
What inspired me was a rather realistic balancing of hope and prophecy and a grounded appreciation that complex realities are involved, first at the political and intellectual levels, and second, where it matters most, with the myriad communities where poverty and sharing are not abstractions but a daily challenge.
Having a policy and enforcing the policy are two totally different and separate things. After all, law without enforcement is no law at all.
With strong leaders from both the public and private sector, we can slow climate change now by putting a price on carbon, eliminating fuel subsidies, and bring together bold, innovative country plans.
While in some extreme cases schools have to be closed when they are at the center of an outbreak, investing in safe schools -- and the return of pupils to receive regular temperature checks and health education -- may be the best way to combat Ebola's further spread.