J.M. Barrie

There are so many different components behind the makings of a brilliant book, plot and characterization being two key factors
Image: "April Wakes" illustration by M.T. Ross, 1914, from A Year with the Fairies by Anna M. Scott. Public domain via Wikimedia
Based on the popularity of the story, plays, and film adaptions, Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie is one of those classics. In Wendy Darling (SparkPress, October 2015), Colleen Oakes explores Wendy's experience in Neverland, unfolding this classic tale in a marvelous new direction.
Jason Fuchs has enjoyed a long career in the film and television industry on the acting side of things. But what is even more interesting is his journey as a screenwriter.We spoke with Jason on the eve of the upcoming release (October 9th, 2015) of his live-action feature debut, Pan.
If Finding Neverland isn't a brilliant musical, it's still an entertaining one, using all sorts of stage legerdemain to entrance an audience looking for good old-fashioned Broadway magic.
As one of Broadway's most anticipated musicals of the 2014-2015 season, Finding Neverland doesn't disappoint.
Lost boys: Looked more like dudes from West Side Story. Imagine for a second a few finger snapping steps in homage to that.
Pirate-mania is all the rage these days. Luckily for us, there is a virtual treasure trove of pirate books. Here are some classic tales of piracy to keep your ship afloat.
Friendships can be tricky, especially when people are as seemingly different as J.M. Barrie, author of Peter Pan, and R. F. Scott, the Antarctic explorer. They are the subject of The Mythmakers.
So alter the mice -- let's help cure disease -- but let's also take the opportunity to stop for a moment and reflect on what a memory is and isn't, and how we'd like to remember and be remembered.
The most common question I'm asked about my art is, "Where do you get your ideas?" I love the written word and quotations inspire me. When I read or hear something that strikes a chord, images begin to form in my brain.
Imagine you're vacationing in a seaside hotel in Cornwall and casually pick up a dusty volume of plays in the library. That's the feeling of This Side of Neverland, now at the Pearl Theater.
If you know one thing about a man named J. M. Barrie, you most likely know that he is responsible for a story named after its most famous character: Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up.
When I see you walk the streets of New York, it makes me cry. You look like you fit right in and that you are your own, independent person. It's as if you were never a baby who fell asleep in my arms. You look like you just showed up one day, fully-formed. It's amazing and incomprehensible.
As an adult, Peter Pan began to take on new and greater meanings -- and take it from a Wendy, there are a lot of life lesson you can squeeze out of those tights.
Cathy Rigby is Peter Pan. At 60, she flies across the stage with as much zeal as she did when she first played the role 39 years ago in a 1974 theatre-in-the-round production.
And when it comes to words that command attention, nothing can beat those that are phrased according to the figure of speech known as dehortatio, which Willard R. Espy once crisply defined as "dissuasive advice given with authority."
Peter Pan and his band of Lost Boys never fail to spark curiosity, among adults as much as children. Now, an Off-Broadway production has brought Peter back to life in an entirely unique way.
Peter Pan author JM Barrie, a cricketing fanatic, gathered the most famous writers of his day to play on his amateur team