In Woody Allen's new movie, Café Society, Kristen Stewart plays a girl from Nebraska who tries her luck in 1930's Hollywood
Whether they found an irresistible role or just aged gracefully into maternal parts, these actresses decided to change things up and channel their inner mom.
One expects Shock -- with a capital 'S' -- when reading a book called The Mommie Dearest Diary -- Carol Ann Tells All. And actress Rutanya Alda's book, all about the nightmare of playing Joan Crawford's faithful maid opposite Faye Dunaway in the notorious 1981 camp classic, does not disappoint. All the rumors about Ms. Dunaway's grandstanding diva behavior are true, if Ms. Alda is to be believed.
The sad truth is that performers who think, and thereby encourage us to think, endanger the dollar, meaning that it's far safer to foster a celebratory attitude towards imbeciles who are fed on an endless diet of schadenfreude and 10-second fame. But the really tragic thing is that as long as we surrender to this malaise.
My generation discovered the big-eyed waifs at grandma's house or in the marginalia of our local thrift shops. The generation older than me knows that at one point Margaret Keane's big-eyed paintings of children were everywhere.
Sherry Vine: I really wanted to do this show ever since I saw it the first time they did it in NYC years ago. I just thought
In The Fatal Weakness, George Kelly's 1946 vehicle for Ina Claire and now revived at the Mint after 68 years, Ollie Espenshade (Kristin Griffith) is a spoiled rich woman who initially looks as if she could be Harriet Craig's younger sister. She's so off-putting that it very soon seems the script in which she's embedded is becoming unfortunately weak, if not fatal.
It showed me an adult life that was about parties and friends and sex and sparkling wit and messiness and creativity and longing for something outside of convention. It gave me the insatiable appetite to reach beyond my circumstances. It gave me a vista of what kind of life was possible for a homosexual like me.
"Oh, I am so bored with it all." Said by Winston Churchill shortly before slipping into a coma. The British Prime Minister
It was the first time that I didn't think about having -- or not having -- a drink. I lost myself in the joy of that matinee performance and the exuberance of the performers who were happy to be alive despite -- or because of -- the years of baggage behind them.
Similarly, both the literary and film incarnations of Mommie Dearest have endeared Crawford to the lesbian, gay, bisexual