joan didion

The perfect literary way to celebrate Women's History Month. 💁🏽 📚
In "South and West," the essayist took notes on isolation and conservative mores.
It’s nice to know that someone has been there before -- and made some lasting art from it to boot.
Jacob Bernstein's HBO documentary about his mother, Nora Ephron, proves the inside-the-box life is not worth living, as it gives you little material to work with. Probably the most famous Ephron line is "I'll have what she's having." It also sums up how many of us feel about Ephron. I'll have what she's having: the ambition, the wit, the genre-crossing, the credits, the confidence, the recipes, the large and talented circle of friends.
Some say "You are as young as you feel," and, if that's the case, models like Marie Helvin might as well be forever 21. I, for one, don't want to look like I'm in my 20s if that means feeling like beauty is at odds with pizza.
While social anxiety can truly, at moments, suck, it may have also invoked strengths in you. Embrace those strengths. Be thankful for them. Trust them. Allow yourself to be empowered by them. Continue to use them to carve out your niche in the world.
When I heard that Amazon was doing a miniseries based on Philip K. Dick's Hugo-winning novel from the Sixties, I realized that it had been sitting on my shelves between DeLillo and Didion for years. Once I picked up the 1992 paperback (with a weird cover) and dusted it off, I couldn't put it down.
Grannan is witness to the people who find themselves on the other side of the American dream in California's now-arid Central Valley, every bit as parched as the cracked and desiccated soil they live on.
Since the beginnings of film, literature has played a significant role in developing the medium. Adaptations are everywhere, but here are some literary tales that we hope inspire more stories on the silver screen.
Like a young Joan Didion or a middle-aged Woody Allen, I have had an enduring love affair with my birthplace -- Manhattan, particularly its West Side.
If the eyes are the windows to the soul, then the first line is the window to the book. A first line can drag you in, shock you, confuse you, or touch you. A first line is what makes you read on. Here are some of our favorite first lines that set the tone for some incredible books.