job creators

"It's the one form of bigotry that is still allowed in America, and that's bigotry against the successful."
1. The "job creators" are CEOs, corporations, and the rich, whose taxes must be low in order to induce them to create more jobs. Rubbish.
As you can see from the chart, 46 percent of our job creators would rather spend money on technology than employ humans, compared
Does anyone actually still believe the words "trickle-down theory" have any valid meaning? Is anyone buying into this fiction that increasing the minimum wage would ruin our economy but multi-million dollar executive salaries don't increase prices at all?
America's job creators have an idea that will avoid making the nation's "takers" even more lazy and shiftless and, at the same time, help build our domestic energy industry.
If you are thinking about becoming an entrepreneur, now is not the time to stay on the sidelines. As one popular saying goes, "If you do not step forward, you'll always be in the same place."
Responding to new statistics that prove the Big Apple is the poverty capital of America, Mayor Bloomberg praised inequality: "If we could get every billionaire around the world to move here, it would be a godsend."
Gillian Tett, editor and columnist for the London Financial Times wrote an FT article on April 13, 2012 called "US companies
There's a myth in this country that enormous wealth doesn't come from anywhere or anyone, that it's self-creating and self-sustaining, thriving on pure oxygen like an epiphyte or a garden fairy. In reality, highly concentrated wealth is caused by actions -- human actions with human consequences.
The JobRaising Challenge is a competition organized by The Huffington Post, the Silicon Valley-based Skoll Foundation, and
When President Obama took the stage at McCormick Place in Chicago well after midnight, we were all too wiped out with joy
Who would have guessed that it would take a debate on foreign policy to reveal what Barack Obama and Mitt Romney think about education?
So many elements of our lives (benefits, retirement, continuing education) are tied to the antiquated models of employment and it's going to take a lot of untangling to totally free ourselves.
Like many American cities, a significant subset of our population remains in poverty, lacking the skills needed to fill many of the jobs the city has to offer. As mayor, it's my job to figure out how to both address our city's challenges and boost our assets and, whenever possible, find solutions that meet those two needs at the same time. The city's hospitality industry offers Philadelphia that solution.
While all of the cameras and reporters are focused on the convention floor in Charlotte this week, there is a different story going on behind the scenes that hardly anyone has noticed. In the first six months of this year, international visitors spent an estimated $82.2 billion on U.S. travel and tourism-related goods and services, an 11 percent increase over the same period last year. Each one of those foreign dollars helps build up our economy and create new jobs that can never be outsourced overseas.
As thousands of Democratic National Convention delegates descend on the great City of Charlotte, North Carolina, mayors across the country are reminded of just how important our convention, tourism and hospitality industries are for our local economies. In Baltimore, we have made smart investments in tourism to promote our city as a desired destination for large conventions, sports fans and the casual weekend traveler. These investments have had major impact on the city as a whole and the well-being of all of our residents.
Like Republicans, I believe that U.S. policy should do all it can to help job-creators. The only difference is that I know who the real job-creators are and they don't.
Let's put the premise of Ryan's libertarian economics to a test he can believe in: let's offer tax breaks to the wealthy in the form of jobs vouchers