joblessness

When a Mouse Dances With a Hippo Even those around the world who don't favor America still see the USA as the land of opportunity
Why would the WSJ choose to emphasize with a headline its own opinion about a specific "suggestion" that simply never occurred
Let's say you are applying for a new job. You have a professional resume, a complete LinkedIn profile, letters of recommendation and you have lots of experience for the position you are applying to.
A few years ago in Copenhagen, a young woman challenged a gathering of United Nations climate delegates by asking, "How old will you be in 2050?" It was a simple, but powerful, shot across the bow for the "adults" in the room -- most of whom will not be around to see the impact of their policy plans. Such poignant moments are, unfortunately, too rare.
So, while I may not be able to work a traditional nine to five, I absolutely have an occupation; one that requires much time, effort, precision, and responsibility. When I now sit down in those uncomfortable waiting room chairs to fill out the dreaded new patient paper work I no longer have a lump in my throat. When I reach the occupation blank I can write with satisfaction that I am a "Professional Patient."
The labor force remained flat in August, meaning the participation rate is still stuck at a low 62.6%, more than three points off of its peak prior to the downturn. Some of that decline can be assigned to retiring boomers, but some remains due to persistently weak demand.
Today's strong jobs report shows continued solid growth in payroll employment, and many other labor market indicators have recovered substantially since the Great Recession. Nevertheless, the Federal Reserve should not rush to raise interest rates but should test whether it can push unemployment lower.
This is the season in many people change jobs or retire. Some of those changes are governed by the academic calendar, some by the change in seasons, and some by tradition.
3 million Americans over the age of 50 and roughly 75 million youth worldwide are currently looking for work, with many more not being accounted for as they live and work in informality.
Congress should amend the President's free tuition idea to create the civilian equivalent of a GI Bill for young adults who engage in 1-3 years of national service. That single change would turn the President's proposal from a college giveaway to an opportunity that serves both the individual and the country.