Joe Berlinger

Jarmusch had two films this year: Paterson and Gimme Danger, a documentary about Iggy Pop and the Stooges, both highlights
The 5th Annual American Documentary Film Festival opens with 'Tony Robins: I Am Not Your Guru.'
Recently nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature, What Happened, Miss Simone? showcases the life of this brilliant, dynamic, passionate and deeply tormented music icon with rare footage and recordings that have never been seen or heard before.
There was always talk that the fibbies looked the other way when it came to Bulger because he was an informant. But was he really? Based on what I saw in this documentary, the answer was no... or at least more no than yes.
Begin Again comes from writer-director John Carney, who burst forth with Once a few years ago. This film, which stars Keira Knightly and Mark Ruffalo (among others), captures the same blend of wistful emotions and life-affirming musical energy as that 2006 hit.
Neighbors may not be a particularly well-thought-out film (huge third-act problems). But it has some of the biggest sustained laughs of the summer.
A: I don't think there's any magic secret "finagling." Just make a great film. Let the work speak for itself. It's now ridiculously
Now, we get Hank: Five Years from the Brink, in which former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry "Hank" Paulson gives us a play-by-play of how he, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and Federal Reserve chairman Timothy Geithner, kept everything from collapsing while alternately massaging and challenging the various egos that ran the nation's largest banks.
In a new interview, Joe Berlinger reflects one his lengthy battle for the West Memphis Three's freedom and how he views the case today.
Peter Jackson's The Hobbit isn't the only film the director has opening. West of Memphis, the documentary he and partner Fran Walsh produced, revisits the murder of three 8-year-olds in 1993, and the three teens who went to jail for the crime.
Man, it was 25 years ago. The Grammy-winning album Graceland -- following what was arguably Paul's best album to that point, Hearts And Bones -- helped change the rules of pop music and politics.
"One of the great ironies of this three-film, two-decade mission is that we thought we were making a film about bad children, the inside story of why kids kill."
Last October when the documentary Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory premiered at the New York Film Festival, filmmakers Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky celebrated an unanticipated event: the release from prison of the West Memphis 3.
For documentary filmmakers, it doesn't get better than this: having your work bring about change.
Documentaries tell us who we are, what our world is about, and give us the truth. But more and more these filmmakers find themselves, especially in the US, attacked by layer upon layer of lawsuits funded by corporations with deep pockets.
Truth and freedom, Coolidge said, "are inseparable." There is "no justification for interfering with the freedom of the press