joe mccarthy

Copyright © 2017 by Richard J. Rosendall. All rights reserved. In 1852, long before the advent of reality television, a self
"Hey up there! Listen, I know that I'm deceased and should, by the laws of nature, desist, but I just can't sit around here in Hell (which is basically Miami without any Publix supermarkets) and watch you people let the Commies take over America."
Under J. Edgar Hoover, the FBI asserted that the mafia didn't exist, enabled Joe McCarthy's witch hunts and worked diligently
The Trump Convention has been a strange mash-up of three previous moments in Republican history -- each of which ended tragically. First, most seminally, is Joe McCarthy's rise and fall, and the witch-hunt he unleashed.
Newt Gingrich's supposed smartness is rather indiscriminate, when examined closely. Newt has what he considers 10 or 12 brilliant ideas each day, which he is in the habit of just tossing out for discussion.
This week the media edged closer to their Murrow moment. In the 50s, CBS broadcaster Edward R. Murrow took on Sen. Joe McCarthy and his unscrupulous red-baiting, helping bring about McCarthy's downfall. And this week, the media finally began to call out Donald Trump's racism and point out the cowardice of those like Paul Ryan, who admitted Trump's comments about Judge Gonazalo Curiel were the "textbook definition of racism" -- and yet continued to endorse him. So the media edged closer to their Murrow moment, but they still have a long way to go, judging by their reaction to Trump's speech after winning the California primary. Only Donald Trump could be praised for a speech just because it did not include any overt racism. But whether he "pivots" to being "presidential" or not, we know what he thinks, and we know what "textbook" beliefs his policies are based on. "This is no time," said Murrow of McCarthy, "to remain silent." Nor to ignore or euphemize the grave danger we're facing.
When in the past have you ever heard the term "unendorse" used? We haven't checked, but we believe it just got coined and added to the political lexicon.
Boy, it isn't every day you get to write a headline like that! But those are the kinds of feelings Ted Cruz seems to bring out in everyone -- left, right, and center.
For a politician or a journalist, there was a time when citing the classics -- as long as it wasn't done in a pedantic or pompous manner -- was a mark of wisdom and experience. If a candidate or reporter does it today, there's a good chance they'll be trolled and ridiculed for high-handed pretension. Cue Donald Trump shouting, "Loser!"
Here's the scene setter. My living room, a glass of wine (or two), early evening, and---- I'm watching the recent film 'Trumbo' with Academy Award Nominee Brian Cranston in the lead role and about halfway through I jump up and yell, 'I can't believe it, it's just like today!