john hughes

Spoiler: There are usually financial consequences for stupidity.
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Matthew Broderick and Alan Ruck had a lot of laughs behind the scenes.
The hilarious audition that caught the attention of John Hughes and Matthew Broderick.
Matthew Broderick's quintessentially disenfranchised Reagan-era youth taught life lessons in an epic Senior Ditch Day that still ring true as June 18, the 30th anniversary of the film's release, approaches.
A collection of totally different people were all put into a room together. At some point, we look at this crappy hand we've been dealt and focus on turning it into something.
Marilyn Vance on how John Hughes' vision helped her develop Andie and Duckie's out-there styles.
Ready Player One isn't just a book about video games--it's a hilarious, rollicking joyride through '80s pop culture featuring a big-hearted protagonist that you can't help but root for and his epic quest for fame, wealth, and love.
Sleeping Beauty publicly confronted the Prince today, "What kind of degenerate sicko kisses sleeping women? Seriously? Don't kiss sleeping women, you mother-humpin' perv." She went on to announce plans to file charges against the Prince.
Depending on which source you believe, there are between one and two dozen -- yes, you read that right, dozen -- films opening this Friday in New York. Here is a brief look at a half-dozen of them.
Life is about honesty. You make a mistake, you learn from it, and then explain to your kids where you screwed up. If you want to lead by example you must do so with unmasked honesty.
Last weekend I traveled to Chicago for a high school reunion that we decided to hold outside of the usual decade milestones. This was #43. I couldn't make the 40th as I had a wedding that same weekend, but it was fairly well-attended and everyone seemed amenable to getting together more often.
Bill Murray as Franklin Delano Roosevelt in "Hyde Park on the Hudson" solves world peace by encouraging The King of England to eat a hot dog.
I'm here to tell you that growing up the way we did was not a long-term favor or blessed accomplishment. Let me be clear that I don't blame my parents. No, my disdain for nostalgia has more to do with cold, hard facts and unpleasant anecdotes than personal issues.
Remember the great John Hughes film The Breakfast Club, in which five high school students (labeled as "the brain, the athlete, the basketcase, the princess and the criminal") are forced to peacefully coexist in Saturday detention?
At the film's core beats an optimistic heart, inspiring slackers and desk-anchored professionals alike to get outside and, even if for one day. With the help of this guide, you too can call in sick for the day and check out the same Chicago locations that Ferris and his crew visited.