john nash

Over the past decade or so, the climate has improved for people with mental illness, and that is true whether or not a person has a beautiful mind.
Unfortunately, genius often has a dark side. In the university town of Princeton, NJ, where smart people gather like exotic butterflies, no one thinks twice about it.
If the above sounds to you like advice for the business world rather than for dating - be honest, how many people have you held to these standards so far? (Which describe the minimum, rather than the maximum of what you deserve.)
I don't pretend to have known John Nash. Once upon a time, though, when I was a graduate student in the English Department at Princeton University, I often saw him in a somewhat unlikely place.
John Nash was a legend. He simply looked at things differently. He taught me that even geniuses need other people to correct their thinking and vet their ideas. Most importantly, however, Nash taught me that anyone's mind can be beautiful if it focuses on producing beautiful ideas.
The Nobel Prize-winning mathematician whose struggle with schizophrenia was the basis for the movie "A Beautiful Mind” died with his wife in a tragic car accident over the weekend.
"A Beautiful Mind," which won four Oscars, followed Nash's pioneering work in game theory. The film also recounted Nash's
Nash was the subject of the Academy Award-winning film "A Beautiful Mind." The film depicted his groundbreaking work in game
The pair never collaborated on a paper but worked together informally in the 1950s, New Scientist reported. John F. Nash