john sculley

One thing is certain in any business – not everyone you have to deal with will be like you, or will like you (and vice versa
At brunch at the Vault in the St. Regis Hotel last week, writer Aaron Sorkin spoke about his script, loosely based on Walter Isaacson's biography.
The report said Sculley declined to comment on the matter, but told the Canadian newspaper that he has been a long-time BlackBerry
It tells us too much about Apple, and not enough about Jobs. And what it does tell us about Jobs is more a depiction of of events rather than an incisive look at what made him the great, maddening, transformational figure he was.
For every inspirational speech introducing yet a new more inventive product than the last, Jobs, so focused on his vision, loses his connection to those who love him. That is what makes him so compelling a figure, so flawed; in Joshua Michael Stern's film, he's in a league with Picasso.
Moore’s law has been completely predictable for 40 years. You really need about a generation between each of [the] big innovations
But Sculley chose Apple, bringing along his close ties to ex-boss PepsiCo chairman Don Kendall and other powerful China policy
From the beginning, the creator and the creation were a single bonded brand. It is an exceptional business achievement if people think of you when they see the product and the product when they see you.
In a former era, Sculley got to know both Jobs and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates. From the beginning, it was clear the