John Turturro

Now all this may have been the specific intent of creators Steve Zaillian and Richard Price. They may have been making the
"Every boxer is someone's hero." It's a saying that's been hard to attach to Roberto Durán. Most people assume that he is just an infamous Panamanian boxer who walked out on a match against Sugar Ray Leonard, uttering the words, "No Mas (no more)." There's more to him than that controversial moment. This very well acted, entertaining and informative bio film reveals all: Rough childhood, abandonment issues, international champion, infamy, resurgence and hometown hero.
HBO's The Night Of was worth the wait. The eight-part miniseries, which drills deep into the case of a New York man arrested for a murder he's pretty sure he didn't commit, premieres Sunday at 9 p.m. ET.
O Brother, Where Are Thou? hit theatres 15 years ago, on December 22, 2000. And to this day it remains my favorite film. O Brother transcends age, tastes, and even sociopolitical leanings.
The profane, bowling ball-licking, hairnet-wearing maniac fleshed out by Turturro for the 1998 film was based on a real person, according to the actor who received the John Cassavetes Award at the Denver Film Festival on Nov 12.
Photograph by Erica Simone Loan was discovered at the age of 16 by the Elite modeling contest while living in the South of
Nanni Moretti's latest film Mia Madre is a solid emotional voyage into what it means to face a parent's imminent death. Margherita Buy plays a film director who is making a movie about striking workers in a factory while her beloved mother (played with great dignity by theater actress Giulia Lazzarini) begins her descent to death.
Indeed, there was no elephant-in-the-room in the spacious Alice Tully Hall: Every woman presenting, from Jane Fonda to Elisabeth Moss, spoke about Redford's good looks. But clearly, he is much more than eye candy.
Ridley Scott is no Cecil B. DeMille. That's not necessarily a bad thing. What it means is that Scott's new epic Exodus: Gods and Kings is as much a product of our high-tech new-millennium era as The Ten Commandments was of the Eisenhower gray-flannel suit period.
Say whatever else you want to about 2014, here's one thing I know for sure. It had 365 days. And since new movies opened on screens across the USA on a great many of those days, I feel compelled to consider the year in films.
Usually when a film depicting a story from the Bible is made, the main danger for a studio is angering religious groups who feel that the film is attacking their beliefs or strays too far from accepted (or at least favored) interpretations.
Woody Allen is up to his old tricks. Real ones, like pulling a rabbit out of a hat. In previous films he's played the magician role himself, but in Magic in the Moonlight he allows the dreamy Colin Firth to handle the willing suspension of disbelief.
In Scott's adaptation, Moses (Christian Bale) battles with Pharaoh Ramses (Joel Edgerton) in an effort to free thousands
Neighbors may not be a particularly well-thought-out film (huge third-act problems). But it has some of the biggest sustained laughs of the summer.
It was 15 years ago next month that Star Wars: The Phantom Menace was released. The MovieFilm guys have decided to look back at the worldwide phenomenon that led up to and followed the first Star Wars film to be released after the instantly iconic original trilogy.
In the hilarious old-school tradition, Bullets Over Broadway at the St. James Theater, based on Woody Allen's 1994 film of
"[Woody Allen] has been making many films since this alleged thing occurred, or didn't occur," he said. "For me, he's my
When he succeeds - and then gets himself plugged into the Internet - well, is it a good thing or a bad thing? There are so