John Updike

A statistician ran the analysis on popular and classic books, and the results are in.
What ensues is a tragic and powerful tale of love and hate, tragedy and rebirth. Zilelian's prose is lyrical at times, but for the most part she crafts a purposely flat realism that perfectly complements her subject matter.
Watch Me Go concerns Douglas "Deesh" Sharp, who has managed to stay on the right side of the law by hauling junk for cash. But after he and two friends dispose of a sealed oil drum, Deesh finds himself betrayed, and running from the police.
For mystery, suspense and thriller novels, viewing the plot as "(almost) irrelevant" seems an extraordinary stretch. Frankly, I find that conclusion preposterous.
This was originally posted to The Screaming Pope, Francis Levy's blog of rants and reactions to contemporary politics, art
No matter how beautifully written or "literary," a novel resonates deeply because the storyline tugs powerfully at us. It upsets, confounds and presents chaos, conflict, imbalance and upheaval -- either within its character's mind or circumstances.
But when he brings up the question of novelists, playwrights and composers he's on shaky ground. Sure most creatives dream
I just played a little free-word association and you can see where I landed: Start with secrecy -- often the excuse for spying -- and see where you end up.
If I am my father's daughter, it is because we can lose ourselves, and find ourselves, in great literature.
It's official: the end of the Easter season. Pretty soon, in fact, the church will settle in for a long summer of what it calls ordinary time. But not yet.
Okay, I'm going to go ahead and say what may sound entirely self-serving. Know what's really keeping the whole herd of clatter-trapping humanity slouching toward anything that might resemble progress? Grandmothers.
A dentist Ray Testa, who is 58, leaves his wife Angie, to run off with his 31year-old hygienist, Shelby. At the wedding he announces: "I now belong to an incredibly exclusive club. There are not many men who can say that they're older than their father-n-law."
So, Philip Roth is calling it quits after almost 60 years of writing. I don't want to suggest that Roth was being disingenuous about his retirement, but I do think that there is more going on than a mere statement of fact. After all, what writer announces his departure?
As useful and universal as the experience of living with the list has been, I can't help thinking: Isn't there something else we might add to the roster? We're always changing and growing, after all; mightn't The List reach in new directions too?
Literature fans love "encounters" with living or dead authors. These might involve seeing novelists at book signings, listening to them give a talk, or visiting homes/museums connected with famous authors of the past.
John Updike would have been 79 this Sunday. When he died of lung cancer in January 2009 the Web lit up with tributes, and as I read them I remembered my own John Updike story.
If a call came tomorrow and you were asked to take over as editor of the Times Book Review, what, if any, changes would you make?
From Flavorwire Yesterday marked the kickoff of National Novel-Writing Month (aka NaNoWriMo), the online project that challenges
Former publisher rubbished by Naipaul for writing 'feminine tosh' says she is not taking his criticism seriously. Read more