jokowi

"America First" is based in exclusivism, but Indonesia’s nationalism has far more pluralistic connotations.
In September 1945, Australian waterside workers imposed "a black ban" on all Dutch ships destined for Indonesia in Australian
The lives of 10 others on death row were spared, at least for now.
Undeniably, these three reasons demonstrate that the political, social, and economic circumstances of Papuan issue cannot
MANILA, Philippines -- "The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion," Edmund Burke, the great 18th century conservative thinker, once warned. Today, a specter is hunting the democratic world -- the specter of autocratic nostalgia.
"There is no nice way to say this," he told Jokowi. "You are not presidential material, and your political influence is very low.
Indonesia doesn't often get the attention it deserves, but it is a key country with major links to the United States. It's in the G7, and millions of its citizens or former citizens live in the U.uS.
When Indonesian President Joko Widodo visits Washington this week, President Obama will be playing host to a world leader whose government is seemingly doing everything it can to launch itself as quickly as possible into the top ranks of climate polluters.
Clearly, the Philippines continues to see the AIIB as some kind of Chinese Trojan horse to buy the loyalty of neighbors and some measure of territorial acquiescence in exchange for economic carrots. Manila is also not comfortable with China having huge presence in its strategic, infrastructure sectors.
Underneath the rumble of political debates, the tender shoots of a new global consensus around commonsense, practical and progressive economics are emerging. It's what Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven calls the Global Deal -- a new compromise between capital and labor that would ensure shared prosperity by putting jobs at the center of global macroeconomic policy.