jonathan franzen

How do you succeed as a writer? Get useful, and humorous, advice from someone who indeed has indeed made it through the loophole
Interviews by Christian Lund, Kasper Bech Dyg and Marc-Christoph Wagner. The interviews can be watched in full length at
In this one world, it sometimes seems a race is on between the newly empowered and the recently dispossessed. The truth is not only that both realities exist simultaneously, but that one is a condition of the other.
Women writers get reviewed less and win fewer awards. Who’s taking a stand?
We visited Jonathan Franzen at his California home, where he shared his approach to writing character-driven novels and his thoughts on being a writer in America: "I play for 'Team Literature' and so I'm on the lookout for things that threaten the team."
Thanksgiving means more than just turkey, stuffing, and pumpkin pie. Our favorite part of the holiday is spending it with our families. In the spirit of Thanksgiving, here are 12 literary families that will make you love your own family even more.
On the lengths to which we'll go to defend our great white male novelists.
I really perked up when the conversation turned to the notion of likability. Who says we have to like a character? Yet Franzen claims that "the safest thing" in writing fiction is not caring what the reader wants, in the sense of realizing, "Not everyone will like this guy."
It's about the encroachment of techno-fascism, a false utopia that leads inevitably to corruption and violence. Also, moms.
We live in a world where success is considered to be directly correlated to the amount of commas in a person's bank account, and to some degree, success and monetary returns are tangentially related.
While it is a blatant distortion of how the world really operates, when trying to assess why these characters, who quite obviously resemble real life counterparts as well, say the things they do and live the lives they live when they have so much potential, the answer becomes complicated.
If you're an editor like myself, you have a lot of manuscripts to read. If you're a bookseller, you've got to stay on top of what's being published. This summer it seems like most of the editors and booksellers I know are reading A Little Life, Hanya Yanagihara's second novel.
More than a decade after the first strong signals of the collapse (or at least the twilight) of the American empire, there is yet to be a melancholic reckoning with the decline of empire.