jonathan safran foer

In "We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast," the author argues that individual actions matter when it comes to the environment.
Supported by Nordea-fonden While Foer sees that the voice of the author can drown in the media, he does see an important
"Here I Am" is Jonathan Safran Foer's first novel after 11 years. Jacob Bloch, its anti-hero, after one well-received novel published when he was very young, is writing for television, and doesn't like it.
As promised, today’s New York Times Style Magazine has a story about Natalie Portman and her directorial debut (7.17.16). Apparently
Readers and most writers do not pay much concern to the way the writing looks on the page, but there are daring authors that provide meaning to their work through the use of unique and innovative formatting. Here are a few novels that reimagined what a novel should look like within its physical binding.
If we take apart the motivations and rationales and biographies of some of the leading exponents of plastic realism, we find that their official personas match the ideal neoliberal subject being constituted in their works.
Welfarists believe that farmed animals can be treated with respect in both life and in death, but there is nothing respectful about taking a life. To kill is inherently the utmost act of disrespect.
This past summer, I read the novel Everything Is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer. It details the story of one man, whose
Trying to govern the world with force I see this not succeeding. The world is a spiritual thing, it cannot be forced, to force it is to harm it, to control it is to lose it.
Jeff wrote me a song that he sang in front of the whole school and I thought I was lucky that the same boy who was my first kiss would also be my last, because I was sure I was going to marry him.