jorge bergoglio

MEXICO CITY -- While the Pope cannot and will not be a deus ex machina, nor the answer to Mexico's myriad problems, his visit will surely give hope and inspiration to millions. If he does speak out, it will serve to shine a powerful light on the violence, pervasive corruption, social inequality and injustice in my country.
Francis calls himself "a sinner." Others call him "a radical."
Pope Francis has switched the focus of the Catholic Church away from a high-profile fight against abortion and gay marriage and onto a mission to serve the poor and extend mercy to all. He is far more concerned with issues related to money than to sex.
In the conclave, Pope Francis touched on the early church fathers' sense of the mysterium lunae. The mystery of the moon is that it has no light of its own; it only reflects the light of the sun. He said the church should not mistake itself for the sun. It has instead the mystery of the moon. It must remember that it only shines by reflecting the light of the divine.
The pope's visit to America in September 2015 will have a dramatic impact on the public discourse and issue debates of the presidential and congressional campaigns that will formally begin in January 2016, to the advantage of liberals.
We have seen a great shift in this Vatican's tone. But what have we not seen? We have not seen the shift fully extend to the women of the church.
He may be the first Pontiff to merit a Harvard Business School case study in 21st Century executive leadership. Consider the situation he inherited when he took office.
“I am alive thanks to one of them,” Pope Francis said. “When I had lung problems in the hospital, the doctor gave me penicillin
Vatican doctrine still holds that same-sex and marriage and love are sinful. The pontiff has yet to fling "open the door" (to employ the terminology Ratzinger et al used) to the discussion of Women's Ordination.