joseph stiglitz

Eras in which population growth furthered the public good are behind us.
References Acemoglu, D. and Robinson, J. (2000). Why did the west extend the franchise? democracy, inequality, and growth
His new book says the currency "threatens the future of Europe."
So it turns out maximizing stock prices is neither maximizing longer term shareholder value nor profits--since it only benefits
A new rule just announced by the Obama administration will, effective December 1, double the overtime-pay salary threshold and set it to automatically increase every three years. It's about time.
Where's the inflation? It is barely rising, as consumers still wait for bargains before they decide to buy. The overall Consumer Price Index in April rose just 1.1 percent, and is up 2.1 percent less food and energy prices, which have been falling this year.
This year's political campaign has forced the economics profession to reconsider the fraying orthodoxy of free trade.
What's really causing the growing gap between haves and have-nots? Is it mechanical market forces? Outsourcing? Real estate?
SHANGHAI -- "Markets with Chinese characteristics" are as volatile and hard to control as markets with American characteristics. Markets invariably take on a life of their own; they cannot be easily ordered around. To the extent that markets can be controlled, it is through setting the rules of the game in a transparent way. The policy approach China adopts will strongly influence economic performance and prospects worldwide.
What should be at the center of discussions is the increased inequality in wealth and income that is affecting U.S. economic growth in particular, but also the rest of the world. But instead, most of the attention has been focused on China's growth problems, as if China is the world's piggy bank.
So we do not have a learning literacy wisdom to fall back on and worse, we haven't developed assessment regimes to match
Altogether, there are close to eight million people counted as unemployed, but only about 5.4 million job openings. With a big, bold investment in infrastructure, we can move the economy to full employment, raise wages and put our economy -- and our day-to-day lives -- on a more firm foundation.
The only cure for the world's malaise is an increase in aggregate demand. Far-reaching redistribution of income would help, as would deep reform of our financial system -- not just to prevent it from imposing harm on the rest of us, but also to get banks and other financial institutions to do what they are supposed to do: match long-term savings to long-term investment needs.
America is becoming a more divided society -- divided not only between whites and African Americans, but also between the 1 percent and the rest, and between the highly educated and the less educated, regardless of race.
When it comes to criminal justice, the nation is at a crossroads. There is widespread agreement that too many are in prison for too long. Saturday night would be an ideal time for one of the candidates to begin demonstrating leadership on this issue.
The emptiness of past promises stands as a stark warning of the likely emptiness of the promises now to come. We know the trade deal that America needs. If the TPP is not do that, it does not deserve our support: and if it does not deserve our support, that support should not be given.
We can hire more people tomorrow. We can invest in new ventures next week. Most of all, we can raise wages. These are choices people in the private sector can be making immediately--nothing is stopping us but our willful blindness to the crisis around us.
Their policies have to maximize the purchasing power of consumers that power most economic growth. If consumers can't or won't spend more, then our economy can't grow as it should.
The insistence on keeping wages down, stripping away bargaining power from workers, forcing small business owners to pay taxes a year in advance, and cutting pensions will only hamper demand and lead to a deepening spiral of debt.