Journal of the American Medical Association

It takes a significant increase in deaths from a specific cause to affect overall life expectancy.
At the same time, young black adults see a decline in death rates.
If you're counted, you're visible.
Black America has a fast-food problem, and the U.S. government helped create it.
Kids don't recover from lead poisoning, a long-term study shows.
The JAMA writer concluded by quoting an orthopedic physician on medical doctors' "tendency to default to medications" because
The UK's The Telegraph was shocked that Prince Phillip would possibly leave his home with a hearing aid in October 2014: "Hear
A commentary just out in JAMA says many reasonable things about diet and health. The author notes that the overall low quality of the prevailing American diet is an anchor on life expectancy itself. Amen to that.
We need to refocus our resources and attention on the two things that really matter: (1) stopping men and women from getting breast cancer in the first place -- primary prevention; and (2) preventing metastasis if they do.
Recommending for the intake of nuts, but against the fat content of nuts, was always just plain nutty. Failure to learn from the follies of our nutritional history would be even more so.
The study examined statistics for children between the ages of 5 and 11 from 1993 to 2012, and found that while the overall
It is essential to generate and communicate evidence in a way that enables decision-makers to understand the value of investing in prevention while taking into account their priorities, interests and constituencies.
What's that one measly can of soda a day -- your afternoon treat -- really going to do? Quite a bit, according to many leading health organizations.
The AMA recognizes the need to tackle some of today's most troubling chronic health conditions -- cardiovascular disease and diabetes type 2 -- to which smoking can be linked.
As we consider and celebrate these victories, we must also remember how far we have to go. Today, while the rate of smoking has dropped, it remains the leading cause of preventable death, claiming the lives of 440,000 Americans each year.