juba

JUBA, South Sudan -- The headlines will fade, but the needs will not. South Sudan is a country on a precipice, and all of our help and attention is needed now, and in the months to come, if this new country is to realize its bright future.
Gunfire rang out around the capital of the world's newest nation.
"We are living in such small shelters, while the sun is burning down on us and there is not enough water," Rebecca Nyayual
Peter spoke softly, looking at the ground as he explained how he arrived at this displaced persons camp on the outskirts of Juba, capital city of the world's newest nation, South Sudan.
In October, the Government signed a joint communiqué with the United Nations in which it agreed to concrete measures for the prevention of conflict-related sexual violence.
Such involvement contradicts China's traditional doctrine of non-interference in foreign countries' domestic disputes, but Beijing's economic and geopolitical interests in South Sudan have convinced it to bend its rules.
"If peace comes, we will go home," she says, wiping sweat from her brow. "We will rebuild our tukuls [homes] and send our children to school. If [peace does not come] we will stay here, because we have nowhere to go."
South Sudan's conflict has been dominated not so much by fierce battles between government and opposition forces, as by brutal
In two months, violence has shattered South Sudan's fragile markets. Trade is disrupted. Food supplies were looted. Shops were destroyed.