judas

Courage and treachery are common in politics. Rarely do you see it displayed by one person simultaneously. Cruz, who is conducting himself as someone who has already begun the 2020 campaign, delivered an amazing "daily double."
I'm lying on an ice pack early this morning, doing my back exercises and listening to Pray as You Go, a tool for meditation, with monastery bells, music, and a Bible reading. It warms up my cranky body--and cold morning soul. The reading today is from Acts 2--the story of Pentecost, which goes like this.
They exist in every religious tradition. I'm not talking about fundamentalists. I'm talking about people who believe they're called to turn the spirit and idealism of a religious founder or reformer into institutions.
Residents cheered as the papier-mâché mock-up of the GOP front-runner went up in flames.
I decided to see what we can tell about Jesus's relationship with Judas. Jesus wanted him from the beginning. Jesus wanted him despite knowing the reality of who Judas was. He wasn't blindsided at the final hour.
We have become the golden calf. Gilded in likes, favorites, shares, and retweets. Periscoping our every moment while perched on a towering pedestal of selfies. All of it new-century building blocks of ego and validation.
Jesus has gone; he couldn't save Judas, and he won't intercede for David Biro. But we are here. We can turn around and look for them, these young people whose crimes condemned them forever. We can go back for them.
Perhaps he was a bit of both. Clearly, his primary association among the canonical Gospels is that of being a traitor, although the "handing over" of Jesus to the authorities is not necessarily to be rendered as a "betrayal" in the Greek.
Artifacts and archaeology can be a way to take us out of ourselves, to transport us to a time and place not our own, in hopes
The particular incident I am referring to is Jesus being tempted in the wilderness by Satan for forty days, related to us in Matthew 4:1-2, Mark 1:12-13, and Luke 4:1-2.
I am not suggesting that we just suppose that everyone around us can be trusted and we need not worry about our personal safety or the security of personal belongings. But I do propose giving up the practice of focusing on the faults of other people and, instead, looking for their good qualities.
What we do know, though, is that in this age of headlines and catchphrases, in this era of 140 characters and small, square photos on smart phones, we'd do well to judge not as Twitter judges, but as Christ does.
Shaman and ritual expert Donna Henes offers another explanation for Friday the 13th, rooted in goddess traditions. "Thirteen
More than anything else, the average mother is concerned about the health, welfare and safety of her children.
John says that Satan was the motivator in Judas' betrayal of Jesus, but we're best to understand that to mean that despite all the time Judas had spent in Jesus' company, he had not committed his will to Jesus. Judas was not Jesus-possessed, the Gospel of Judas notwithstanding.
Every life lived has something to teach us about ourselves and God, does it not?
Just when I thought that society had gotten over the bizarre charge that Jews were collectively responsible for the death of Jesus, an equally bizarre missive has come along to challenge my complacency.
The House Republicans aren't just betraying their alleged savior by making people go hungry. They are betraying the values this country has lived by for a very long time.
Bible stories are hot and Hollywood studios are rushing to cash in. Although these films are capitalizing on public interest in the Bible, the bestselling book of all time, and the heroes and villains of religious history, there is one story, says filmmaker Armondo Linus Acosta, that has never been made: The Last Supper.