judas

Courage and treachery are common in politics. Rarely do you see it displayed by one person simultaneously. Cruz, who is conducting himself as someone who has already begun the 2020 campaign, delivered an amazing "daily double."
I'm lying on an ice pack early this morning, doing my back exercises and listening to Pray as You Go, a tool for meditation, with monastery bells, music, and a Bible reading. It warms up my cranky body--and cold morning soul. The reading today is from Acts 2--the story of Pentecost, which goes like this.
They exist in every religious tradition. I'm not talking about fundamentalists. I'm talking about people who believe they're called to turn the spirit and idealism of a religious founder or reformer into institutions.
Residents cheered as the papier-mâché mock-up of the GOP front-runner went up in flames.
I decided to see what we can tell about Jesus's relationship with Judas. Jesus wanted him from the beginning. Jesus wanted him despite knowing the reality of who Judas was. He wasn't blindsided at the final hour.
We have become the golden calf. Gilded in likes, favorites, shares, and retweets. Periscoping our every moment while perched on a towering pedestal of selfies. All of it new-century building blocks of ego and validation.
Jesus has gone; he couldn't save Judas, and he won't intercede for David Biro. But we are here. We can turn around and look for them, these young people whose crimes condemned them forever. We can go back for them.
Perhaps he was a bit of both. Clearly, his primary association among the canonical Gospels is that of being a traitor, although the "handing over" of Jesus to the authorities is not necessarily to be rendered as a "betrayal" in the Greek.
“Test everything; retain what is good,” St. Paul wrote to a community of early Christians. It pays to do the same with the
The particular incident I am referring to is Jesus being tempted in the wilderness by Satan for forty days, related to us in Matthew 4:1-2, Mark 1:12-13, and Luke 4:1-2.