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Judiciary

“When politicians attack courts as ‘dangerous,’ ‘political’ ... you can hear the Klan’s lawyers, assailing officers of the court across the South,” said U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves.
President Trump has defended his Supreme Court pick after Kavanaugh was accused of attempted rape.
In practice, however, the impact of the reform remains in question because, rather than having grown from within, foreign
I've been writing for years about the threat of insurrectionism in this country. Now I'm watching my fears come to fruition in this current political climate, where violence is increasingly becoming an acceptable response to court rulings, or political disagreements.
In an ideal world, judges do not subscribe to Cesare Lombroso's racialised typology of a criminal. Instead, they must apply their minds to each case without fear, favor or prejudice.
How many songs get fact-checked? Well, mine for one. I co-wrote a song called "65 Million (Mitch McConnell STFU)" with my
Mitch McConnell swore to uphold the Constitution, and he's doing his best to hold it up.
The Constitution gives the Senate the power to advise and consent. That body is empowered to say no as well as yes. And the most important qualification for office is philosophical. Put simply: Does the nominee believe the Constitution means anything apart from the jurists' personal preferences? If not, then the Senate should reject the nomination.
Leaving Justice Scalia's seat empty until there is a new president would mean that difficult cases this term could come down to a tie, evenly split along ideological lines. So what will it take to get a new justice named?
No doubt, judicial power has grown quietly and discreetly over time. Federal judges seem to have the power to overturn state bans against gay marriage when state legislatures create laws defining marriage as that between a heterosexual man and woman.
Because of this, Why Courts Matter Iowa (a coalition of Iowa organizations dedicated to ending the judicial vacancy crisis
What much research proposes, and history also teaches, is that democracy flourishes when we start with the idea that all people are created equal, and endowed with certain inalienable rights.
Since Republicans gained control of Congress little has been done. The Arbitration Act, which would broadly void forced arbitration contracts, has languished in Congress for six years. A bill to prohibit any school receiving federal student aid from restricting students' ability to pursue legal claims in court likely will not come to a vote.
How do we improve the judiciary? Easy. Change the law. Some suggestions will cost our country virtually nothing, but will reap benefits of fairness, justice, social order and peace, particularly for the most vulnerable.
Republicans do not rank their policy talking points from the most important to the least. Instead, they find those that resonate at the most basic level, and that can be easily drummed into peoples' psyches.
What the new research suggests is that promoting freedom is less about any belief system or form of government than a commitment for nations to follow through on their constitutional promises to uphold religious freedoms.
In today's Turkey, the controversial 1150-room palace of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, dubbed AK Saray, is no less than Kafka's Castle in terms of its absurdity.
Egyptian courts have allowed alleged perpetrators of killings and torture from security agencies to walk free, sometimes without ever appearing in court, while relatives of those killed by police brutality suffer in silence.
Judges in every case ought to evaluate the government's arguments in a way that is sensitive to the ugly reality of legislative sausage-making rather than adopting the unwarranted assumption that we have found angels in the form of politicians and bureaucrats to govern us.
James Dupree is a world-renowned artist and native son of Philadelphia, who is about to see his art studio turned into a grocery store, thanks to the rubber-stamp review that passes for judging when his city exercises the power of eminent domain.