Juno Temple

Actress Juno Temple has been dubbed the "breakout star" of HBO's "Vinyl," standing out amongst veterans like Olivia Wilde
Jason Segel and Juno Temple will also hand out prizes on Saturday.
December has dawned and with it have come the lists. Site & Sound kicked it off with their Best Films (International Division), and then the Independent Spirit nominees followed, and then the National Board of Review, and then, and then, and then.
Last week Helen Hunt, Noel Gallagher, Maria Bello, Michael Sheen, Juno Temple, Penelope Ann Miller, Jay R. Ferguson, Tahj Mowry, Dee Rees, Bruce McCulloch, Andre Braugher and Bethenny Frenkel joined HuffPost Live. Catch up on those conversations.
Ordinarily, I am a lover of clarity, but for the two plus hours I watched Mr. Nobody, I was fully taken by its hypnotic surrealism and provocative paradoxes.
If we've learned anything from the new "Maleficent" trailer that debuted on Disney Channel, it's that Angelina Jolie's cheekbones
If you're an awards junkie, then you already know the likely Oscar nominees. Just to be contrary, I thought I'd nominate people and films who, like boss Jim Gettys, have something less than a chance. These are the films and performances of 2013 that should be considered, but won't be.
This summer has felt like a particularly strong one for women in independent film. Now, Kathryn Hahn makes a wonderful (mostly) dramatic turn in Afternoon Delight, a film about a woman who attempts to bring meaning to her life by letting a stripper move in with her family.
I'll admit it. I have a critic's crush on Kathryn Hahn. Jill Soloway's witty, surprising Afternoon Delight only confirms it.
Neither terrible nor revelatory, Ramaa Mosley's The Brass Teapot is the kind of movie you might stumble across on cable and stick with, if only because, well, you've got nothing better to do.
As awards season amps up, the stars get more beautiful. And, in turn, more adventurous -- yielding mixed results. We saw
Written and directed by Bradley Rust Grey, the heartfelt story follows two damaged teenage girls (Juno Temple and Riley Keough) who fall in love in New York City. The Cronenberg-esque body horror drama was developed over the course of nine years.
Even with the ongoing physical self-abuse, selective punishment and viewer sympathy, The Brass Teapot eventually evolves into a heartwarming narrative that explores universal truths about choices made that can turn disastrous.
Set in California's forgotten Salton Sea, writer-director Elgin James' debut follows 15 year-old Lily (Juno Temple) and her best friend Alison (Kay Panabaker) as they attempt to flee their impoverished community and build a nest in Los Angeles with a group of runaway squatters.
In a summer of movies made of bombastic special effects and obvious action, Killer Joe still has the ability to surprise by keeping it down and dirty -- though you'll need a strong stomach to make it to the end.