Justice and Development Party

Erdogan had to give up the party's leadership when he was elected president nearly 3 years ago. That changed with April’s referendum.
With the recent approval of the constitutional reform package by the President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey is now headed
ISTANBUL -- The Turkish president now has an opportunity to offer something new to Turkey, to the Middle East and to the world. A fresh approach is very badly needed.
ISTANBUL -- We could be witnessing the beginning of the end for Erdoğan and his circle. He evidently hopes that if fighting with the PKK resumes, the resulting chaos will turn the tide in his favor in the Nov. 1 elections. But this desperate strategy is fraught with peril.
The new cabinet includes pro-Kurdish and nationalist legislators.
Two weeks have passed since the legislative elections of June 7 marked a major shift in the recent history of Turkey. The Islamist Justice and Development Party (AKP in Turkish), headed by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, lost its parliamentary majority, declining to 258 out of 550 seats.
Turkey has the potential of becoming a significant global power, but to realize that, Erdogan must change course or leave. His arrogance, though, and self-styled piousness will prevent him from doing either and deny Turkey its deserving place to play a constructive role on the global stage.
Zugurli attributes most of her success to her endlessly supportive family, and to the people of Lice for taking a chance
Turkish Prime Minister Erdoğan's visit to Iran last month symbolized a pivot toward Tehran and a shift in Ankara's Middle East foreign policy.
Declaring a desire to stand "shoulder to shoulder" with Iran in combating terrorism, and driven by Turkey's evolving policy toward Syria, Erdoğan's trip highlighted Ankara and Tehran's tendency to pursue mutual interests when their paths cross.