justice samuel alito

The conservative justice rang the alarm after the court declined to review a case pitting contraception against religion.
Catholic Vote has created a video, "Not Alone," in opposition to last week's Supreme Court ruling granting same-sex couples the right to marry. On their website, they tell us that the video is about "6 courageous young people" who want to "tell the world" that they are not afraid to express their views against same-sex marriage. This video is offensive. Here's why.
In Tuesday's Supreme Court hearings, which will determine whether the Constitution protects same-sex marriage and if states
Alito, who was visiting his alma mater to receive an Award of Merit along with fellow Yale Law School alumni Justices Clarence
To understand what the Supreme Court did and didn't hold, you have to go back to a 1977 case called Abood v. Detroit Board of Education.
Know your rights and assert them. As Justice Ginsburg said in another context, "Better bitch than mouse."
The logical conclusion of this reasoning is that if the government could have enforced arranged marriage with a federal law, it should have, since no one could predict the outcome of these newfangled romantic-love marriages, which altered the institution of marriage forever.
Longtime Supreme Court observer Garrett Epps called it a "mini-tantrum" and "display of rudeness." Washington Post columnist
Whether the Court's recent turns will threaten the public's perception of the Court, and the court system as a whole, remains to be seen. But the jury is out, and the data seems to be coming in: The Court appears in the midst of a significant partisan turn, one that could threaten its long-term legitimacy.
Some observers will no doubt want to wait a couple of months to see how the Bush-dominated court rules in this case. But based on what I've seen from the justices already, the writing is on the Wal.