juvenile detention

The National Collaboration for Youth, which represents national youth serving organizations around the country such as YMCA’s
Family rejection, discrimination in our communities, discriminatory enforcement of laws, and hostile school environments all play a part. But let's focus on how the climate in our nation's schools puts many LGBTQ youth at greater risk for being criminalized.
In juvenile justice, size matters. Larger isn't better. In fact, it's worse. A youth detention or correctional facility over 25-30 beds is considered large, one of the key traits of a youth prison.
At Artistic Noise, young people in the justice system explore their creative potential and inherent power.
As a child abuse and domestic violence advocate, I've worked comfortable in the knowledge I was on the 'right' side of the crime -- until this spring when I found myself advocating for a 13-year-old African-American Dallas boy accused of sexual assault. He was a victim, too.
On any given day, more than 60,000 children are locked up in our nation's juvenile facilities. Whether it's an urban jail or a rural boot camp, the results are the same.
This week's developments are just part of a larger wave of reform in how communities and the justice system view and treat young people, and a growing recognition that some of our past practices and policies were ineffective.
While news about the health and education of our children can be daunting and dark at times, let's celebrate these beacons of light and hope for holistic health and prevention.
Every day, it seems, criminal justice reform is in the news, and America finally seems to be taking the mass incarceration crisis seriously. Yet this focus has not extended to the progress made and the problems still faced by young people caught up in the justice system.
And it's one more reason why it's so important to think and talk about intersectionally.
Five years ago this month, a young girl from Los Angeles called me from state custody and simply asked, "Can you help me?"  Four years earlier, at 13-years-old, her older sister had handed her over to a pimp.
Far too many lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning youth who encounter the juvenile justice system are placed in facilities that fail to address past experiences of trauma or where they are at risk for sexual violence.
Children of color need to be able to see themselves in the books they read. Just as importantly, all children need to be exposed to a wide range of books that reflect the true diversity of our nation and world as they really are.