K2

At least 70 people have overdosed in a park in New Haven, Conn., after consuming synthetic marijuana known as K2, authorities say. But what exactly is K2 and why is it dangerous?
On Wednesday, New Yorkers awoke to news in the New York Times and New York Post that dozens of people in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn had severe reactions to a batch of K2, a commonly used name for synthetic cannabinoid products.
It's a rare day when the prohibitionist establishment and die-hard drug policy reformers are in agreement -- but that happens to be the case more often than not when it comes to what the U.S. insists on calling "synthetic drugs."
While alarmist media stories have focused on their reported dangers, what often goes unaddressed is that our existing pattern of banning drugs drives the creation of these new substances.
The K2 drug scare has become inextricably linked to the East Harlem's homelessness problem, particularly to the corner of 125th and Lexington, which has long had a significant population of homeless people and is also the site of increasing gentrification.
The NYPD has been drumming up attention over the supposed dangers of "synthetic marijuana" -- a class of cannabinoid chemicals typically sprayed over plant matter and packaged with names like "K2," "Spice" and "Green Giant." Last week, NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton used highly emotional language, calling it "weaponized marijuana" and saying it makes people "totally crazy."
Despite the perpetual obstacles that Pakistan encounters, the citizens of the nation find a way to stand back up. Only if tolerance is practiced by the public, and education becomes common, will the public be able to make Pakistan prosper and make it rank amongst the list of successful states of the world.
Mountains by Denali Schmidt K2 by Denali Schmidt The Summit Of Our Time 3 by Denali Schmidt The "Peak Inspirations" exhibit
“We rigorously looked for those and didn’t come up with anything,” senior study author W. Scott Burgin said. “To the best
As a tool to protect the public from the risks of drugs not being used for medical purposes, the prohibition model has not worked well -- for old drugs or new ones. However, the nation of New Zealand is now trying a different approach.